Recruitment of the infaunal bivalve Soletellina Alba (Lamark,1818) (Bivalvia: Psammobiidae) in response to different sediment types and water depths within the intermittently open Hopkins River estuary

Matthews, Ty and Fairweather, Peter G. 2006, Recruitment of the infaunal bivalve Soletellina Alba (Lamark,1818) (Bivalvia: Psammobiidae) in response to different sediment types and water depths within the intermittently open Hopkins River estuary, Journal of experimental marine biology and ecology, vol. 334, no. 2, pp. 206-218.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Recruitment of the infaunal bivalve Soletellina Alba (Lamark,1818) (Bivalvia: Psammobiidae) in response to different sediment types and water depths within the intermittently open Hopkins River estuary
Author(s) Matthews, Ty
Fairweather, Peter G.
Journal name Journal of experimental marine biology and ecology
Volume number 334
Issue number 2
Start page 206
End page 218
Publisher Elsevier BV
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publication date 2006-07-11
ISSN 0022-0981
Keyword(s) benthos
body-size
habitat architecture
mollusc
post-larval settlement
post-settlement movement;
seasonally closed estuary
soft sediments
Summary Studies examining recruitment processes for soft-sediment macroinvertebrate fauna in intermittent estuaries are rare and most studies of active habitat selection have been tested in the laboratory rather than the field. The present field study examined whether recruitment of the infaunal bivalve Soletellina alba was influenced by water depth and sediment particle size in the intermittent Hopkins River estuary, southern Australia. The number of recruits in sediment trays differed between water depths, but active habitat selection was not evident across treatments of varying sediment particle size. The use of sediments with varying particle sizes also provided an opportunity to identify potential discontinuities in body-size distributions of recruits associated with varying habitat architecture. The length (mm) of recruits was converted to the same scale used to express sediment particle size (i.e. phi units: phi = − log2 of sediment particle size). The size of recruits differed across water depths, but did not differ across treatments with fine (phi = 3) versus coarse (phi = 1) sediment, and no relationships were apparent between bivalve size and sediments consisting of varying particle size. These patterns of recruitment do not correspond with the distribution of adult S. alba within the Hopkins River estuary. Previous sampling has shown that abundances of juvenile and adult S. alba are variable across time, site and water depth, but are often greater at the deeper water depth (1.05 m below the Australian Height Datum). However, recruitment during the present study was greatest at the shallower water depth (0.05 m below AHD), and the apparent absence of active habitat selection suggests that the distribution of adults is unlikely to be attributable to differences in recruitment associated with sediments of varying particle size.
Notes Available online 6 March 2006.
Language eng
Field of Research 060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Elsevier B.V.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003852

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 380 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 09:05:01 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.