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Investigative interviewers' perceptions of their difficulty in adhering to open-ended questions with child witnesses

Wright, Rebecca and Powell, Martine 2006, Investigative interviewers' perceptions of their difficulty in adhering to open-ended questions with child witnesses, International journal of police science and management, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 316-325, doi: 10.1350/ijps.2006.8.4.316.

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Title Investigative interviewers' perceptions of their difficulty in adhering to open-ended questions with child witnesses
Author(s) Wright, Rebecca
Powell, MartineORCID iD for Powell, Martine orcid.org/0000-0001-5092-1308
Journal name International journal of police science and management
Volume number 8
Issue number 4
Start page 316
End page 325
Publisher Vathek Publishing
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2006
ISSN 1461-3557
1478-1603
Summary Best practice guidelines for conducting investigative interviews of children emphasise the importance of obtaining free narrative accounts with the use of open-ended questions. However, research indicates that most investigative interviewers underutilise open-ended questions, even following intensive training in their use. The aim of the current study was to explore investigative interviewers' perceptions of their difficulty in asking open-ended questions. During a training course on how to use open-ended questions, eight child abuse investigators were individually interviewed about why they had asked specific questions in a 10-minute mock interview conducted immediately earlier with a school child. Overall, three reasons were identified. These related to: 1. the specificity of the information required from children; 2. the unfamiliar nature of the open-ended discourse style; and 3. the complex distinction between open-ended versus specific questions. Each of these themes is discussed, along with the implications for trainers and researchers in child investigative interviewing.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1350/ijps.2006.8.4.316
Field of Research 170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003859

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.