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Overweight and obesity prevalence in children based on 6- or 12- month IOTF cut-points: does interval size matter?

Kremer, Peter, Bell, Colin, Sanigorski, Andrea and Swinburn, Boyd 2006, Overweight and obesity prevalence in children based on 6- or 12- month IOTF cut-points: does interval size matter?, International journal of obesity, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 603-605, doi: 10.1038/sj.ijo.0803162.

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Title Overweight and obesity prevalence in children based on 6- or 12- month IOTF cut-points: does interval size matter?
Author(s) Kremer, PeterORCID iD for Kremer, Peter orcid.org/0000-0003-2476-1958
Bell, ColinORCID iD for Bell, Colin orcid.org/0000-0003-2731-9858
Sanigorski, Andrea
Swinburn, Boyd
Journal name International journal of obesity
Volume number 30
Issue number 4
Start page 603
End page 605
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2006-04
ISSN 0307-0565
1476-5497
Keyword(s) BMI
children
IOTF cut-points
overweight
Summary The International Obesity Taskforce (IOTF) recommends using age- and gender-specific body mass index (BMI) cut-points for defining the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children. These are given in both 6- and 12-month age intervals. Since the BMI-for-age curves are nonlinear, a degree of bias will be introduced when age intervals are wide. We aimed to quantify this bias in prevalence estimates in 2178 Australian children aged 4-12 years using 12- versus 6-month age intervals. Using the 12-month interval, the prevalence of overweight and obesity was underestimated by 1.4% compared to the 6-month interval estimates; however, this was age-dependent. It overestimated prevalence for 4-year olds, but underestimated it for older ages by up to 2.6%. Overweight prevalence was generally affected more than obesity prevalence. The use of different age intervals for IOTF cut-points introduces a small but systematic bias in prevalence estimates of overweight and obesity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/sj.ijo.0803162
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Nature Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003917

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.