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The dynamics of adult education : effectiveness of financial education seminars

Clayton, Bruce, Kerry, Michael and Olynyk, Marc 2006, The dynamics of adult education : effectiveness of financial education seminars, International journal of knowledge, culture and change management, vol. 6, no. 8, pp. 71-78.

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Title The dynamics of adult education : effectiveness of financial education seminars
Author(s) Clayton, Bruce
Kerry, Michael
Olynyk, Marc
Journal name International journal of knowledge, culture and change management
Volume number 6
Issue number 8
Start page 71
End page 78
Publisher Common Ground Publishing
Place of publication Altona, Vic.
Publication date 2006
ISSN 1447-9524
1447-9575
Keyword(s) financial planning
adult education
superannuation
Summary This study examines the impact of adult education seminars in superannuation investments for retirement has on the investment intentions and decision making of those adults attending the seminars.  The socio-political context of the data is that of an aging population and a future government being unable to afford the current level of age pensions being paid, and attempting to encourage individuals to plan and provide for their own financial well-being in retirement.  Three themes emerged from the data and were seen to be representative of the major issues found in adult education for financial self-sufficiency: education for knowledge, education for decision making, and education for action.  In an attempt to measure the immediate impact of the seminar on the attendees decision making, the investment intentions of seminar attendees were captured at the start and end of the seminar. This was followed up three months later to see whether the intentions expressed at the end of the seminar had been implemented.  The immediate impact of the seminar was to encourage the respondents to express an intention to increase their investment strategy, however when the follow-up was done three months later, the results were mixed. Some respondents who did not express an intention to change their investment strategy actually made changes, and other respondents who did express an intention to make a change, did not do so.
Notes Reproduced with kind permission of the copyright owner. Readers must contact Common Ground publishing for permission to reproduce this article.
Language eng
Field of Research 130203 Economics, Business and Management Curriculum and Pedagogy
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2006, Common Ground Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003984

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Accounting, Economics and Finance
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