You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Who`s complaining? Using MOSAIC to identify the profile of complainants

Volkov, Michael, Harker, Debra and Harker, Michael 2005, Who`s complaining? Using MOSAIC to identify the profile of complainants, Marketing intelligence & planning, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 296-312, doi: 10.1108/02634500510597328.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
volkov-whoscomplaining-post-2005.pdf Authors' post print application/pdf 1020.42KB 270

Title Who`s complaining? Using MOSAIC to identify the profile of complainants
Author(s) Volkov, MichaelORCID iD for Volkov, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-2459-4515
Harker, Debra
Harker, Michael
Journal name Marketing intelligence & planning
Volume number 23
Issue number 3
Start page 296
End page 312
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing Ltd
Place of publication Bradford, England
Publication date 2005
ISSN 0263-4503
1758-8049
Keyword(s) consumer behaviour
advertising
Australia
computer software
Summary Purpose – The purpose of this article is to bring together established research in the field of consumer complaint responses: to contextualise this research into the area of complaints about advertising in Australia; and to empirically test the proposition that it is possible to construct a profile
of complainants about advertising in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach – Postcodes obtained from the Advertising Standards Board complaints database were entered into Pacific micro marketing MOSAIC software, which uses data at the postcode level to cluster individuals into homogeneous groups.

Findings – Characteristics shared among consumers who engage in “amplified voicing” include above average income levels, above average disposable income levels, higher than average education levels, professional and associate professional occupations, middle- to late-middle-aged household heads and above average representation of working women. Their interests tend towards culture, technology, entertaining, sport, food and fashion.

Research limitations/implications –
Complainants seem to be unrepresentative of those most likely to be disadvantaged by “unacceptable” advertising. It is suggested that it now falls to advertising professionals and marketing academics to encourage greater involvement of all members of Australian society in the current complaints process and build wider understanding of practices that contravene the regulatory system.

Originality/value – This study investigates the effects of advertising on consumers and hence on society in general, and examines the changing nature and structure of the advertising self-regulatory system in Australia. Though based on fieldwork in Australia, it provides an international perspective, and is potentially transferable to other societies.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/02634500510597328
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004072

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 11 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 638 Abstract Views, 271 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 09:11:17 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.