Endurance training in humans leads to fiber type-specific increases in levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-[gamma] coactivator-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-[alpha] in skeletal muscle

Russell, Aaron, Feilchenfeldt, Jonas, Schreiber, Sylvia, Praz, Manu, Crettenand, Antoinette, Gobelet, Charles, Meier, Christoph, Bell, David, Kralli, Anastasia, Giacobino, Jean-Paul and Deriaz, Olivier 2003, Endurance training in humans leads to fiber type-specific increases in levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-[gamma] coactivator-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-[alpha] in skeletal muscle, Diabetes, vol. 52, no. 12, pp. 2874-2881.

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Title Endurance training in humans leads to fiber type-specific increases in levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-[gamma] coactivator-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-[alpha] in skeletal muscle
Formatted title Endurance training in humans leads to fiber type-specific increases in levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α in skeletal muscle
Author(s) Russell, Aaron
Feilchenfeldt, Jonas
Schreiber, Sylvia
Praz, Manu
Crettenand, Antoinette
Gobelet, Charles
Meier, Christoph
Bell, David
Kralli, Anastasia
Giacobino, Jean-Paul
Deriaz, Olivier
Journal name Diabetes
Volume number 52
Issue number 12
Start page 2874
End page 2881
Publisher American Diabetes Association
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2003-12
ISSN 0012-1797
1939-327X
Summary The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ coactivator-1 (PGC-1) can induce mitochondria biogenesis and has been implicated in the development of oxidative type I muscle fibers. The PPAR isoforms α, β/δ, and γ control the transcription of genes involved in fatty acid and glucose metabolism. As endurance training increases skeletal muscle mitochondria and type I fiber content and fatty acid oxidative capacity, our aim was to determine whether these increases could be mediated by possible effects on PGC-1 or PPAR-α, -β/δ, and -γ. Seven healthy men performed 6 weeks of endurance training and the expression levels of PGC-1 and PPAR-α, -β/δ, and -γ mRNA as well as the fiber type distribution of the PGC-1 and PPAR-α proteins were measured in biopsies from their vastus lateralis muscle. PGC-1 and PPAR-α mRNA expression increased by 2.7- and 2.2-fold (P < 0.01), respectively, after endurance training. PGC-1 expression was 2.2- and 6-fold greater in the type IIa than in the type I and IIx fibers, respectively. It increased by 2.8-fold in the type IIa fibers and by 1.5-fold in both the type I and IIx fibers after endurance training (P < 0.015). PPAR-α was 1.9-fold greater in type I than in the II fibers and increased by 3.0-fold and 1.5-fold in these respective fibers after endurance training (P < 0.001). The increases in PGC-1 and PPAR-α levels reported in this study may play an important role in the changes in muscle mitochondria content, oxidative phenotype, and sensitivity to insulin known to be induced by endurance training.
Language eng
Field of Research 060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2003, American Diabetes Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004098

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