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Dietary intake in post-menopausal women

McNaughton, Sarah, Bolton-Smith, Caroline, Mishra, Gita, Jugdaohsingh, Ravin and Powell, Jonathon 2005, Dietary intake in post-menopausal women, British journal of nutrition, vol. 94, no. 5, pp. 813-817.

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Title Dietary intake in post-menopausal women
Author(s) McNaughton, Sarah
Bolton-Smith, Caroline
Mishra, Gita
Jugdaohsingh, Ravin
Powell, Jonathon
Journal name British journal of nutrition
Volume number 94
Issue number 5
Start page 813
End page 817
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2005-11
ISSN 0007-1145
1475-2662
Keyword(s) dietary intake
dietary patterns
food-frequency questionnaire
Summary Si has been suggested as an essential element, and may be important in optimal bone, skin and cardiovascular health. However, there are few estimates of dietary Si intakes in man, especially in a UK population. Following the development of a UK food composition database for Si, the aim of the present study was to investigate dietary intakes of Si amongst healthy women aged over 60 years and to identify important food sources of Si in their diet. Healthy, post-menopausal female subjects (>60 years of age; n 209) were recruited from the general population around Dundee, Scotland as part of an unrelated randomised controlled intervention study where dietary intake was assessed using a self-administered, semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire at five time-points over a 2-year period. Food composition data on the Si content of UK foods was used to determine the Si content of food items on the food-frequency questionnaire. Mean Si intake was 18·6 (sd 4·6) mg and did not vary significantly across the 2 years of investigation. Cereals provided the greatest amount of Si in the diet (about 30%), followed by fruit, beverages (hot, cold and alcoholic beverages combined) and vegetables; together these foods provided over 75% about Si intake. Si intakes in the UK appear consistent with those reported previously for elderly women in Western populations, but lower than those reported for younger women or for men.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004116

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.