Openly accessible

Validation of a food-frequency questionnaire assessment of carotenoid and vitamin E intake using weighed food records and plasma biomarkers: the method of triads model.

McNaughton, Sarah, Marks, G., Gaffney, P., Williams, G. and Green, A. 2005, Validation of a food-frequency questionnaire assessment of carotenoid and vitamin E intake using weighed food records and plasma biomarkers: the method of triads model., European journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 211-218.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
mcnaughton-validationof-2005.pdf Published version application/pdf 507.40KB 20

Title Validation of a food-frequency questionnaire assessment of carotenoid and vitamin E intake using weighed food records and plasma biomarkers: the method of triads model.
Author(s) McNaughton, Sarah
Marks, G.
Gaffney, P.
Williams, G.
Green, A.
Journal name European journal of clinical nutrition
Volume number 59
Issue number 2
Start page 211
End page 218
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2005-02
ISSN 0954-3007
1476-5640
Keyword(s) validity coefficient
dietary assessment
biomarkers
food-frequency questionnaire
weighed food record
method of triads
carotenoids
vitamin E
Summary Background: Reliability or validity studies are important for the evaluation of measurement error in dietary assessment methods. An approach to validation known as the method of triads uses triangulation techniques to calculate the validity coefficient of a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ).

Objective:
To assess the validity of an FFQ estimates of carotenoid and vitamin E intake against serum biomarker measurements and weighed food records (WFRs), by applying the method of triads. Design: The study population was a sub-sample of adult participants in a randomised controlled trial of b-carotene and sunscreen in the prevention of skin cancer. Dietary intake was assessed by a self-administered FFQ and a WFR. Nonfasting blood samples were collected and plasma analysed for five carotenoids (a-carotene, b-carotene, b-cryptoxanthin, lutein, lycopene) and vitamin E. Correlation coefficients were calculated between each of the dietary methods and the validity coefficient was calculated using
the method of triads. The 95% confidence intervals for the validity coefficients were estimated using bootstrap sampling.

Results: The validity coefficients of the FFQ were highest for a-carotene (0.85) and lycopene (0.62), followed by b-carotene (0.55) and total carotenoids (0.55), while the lowest validity coefficient was for lutein (0.19). The method of triads could not be used for b-cryptoxanthin and vitamin E, as one of the three underlying correlations was negative.

Conclusions:
Results were similar to other studies of validity using biomarkers and the method of triads. For many dietary factors, the upper limit of the validity coefficients was less than 0.5 and therefore only strong relationships between dietary exposure and disease will be detected.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Nature Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004118

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 55 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 494 Abstract Views, 20 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 09:12:35 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.