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Cross-adaptation and bitterness inhibition of L-Tryptophan, L-Phenylalanine and urea : further support for shared peripheral physiology

Keast, Russell and Breslin, Paul A. S. 2002, Cross-adaptation and bitterness inhibition of L-Tryptophan, L-Phenylalanine and urea : further support for shared peripheral physiology, Chemical senses, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 123-131.

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Title Cross-adaptation and bitterness inhibition of L-Tryptophan, L-Phenylalanine and urea : further support for shared peripheral physiology
Author(s) Keast, Russell
Breslin, Paul A. S.
Journal name Chemical senses
Volume number 27
Issue number 2
Start page 123
End page 131
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2002
ISSN 0379-864X
1464-3553
Keyword(s) adaptation
psychophysics
bitter taste
amino acids
bitter receptors
taste perception
bitter blocking
Summary A previous study investigating individuals' bitterness sensitivities found a close association among three compounds: L-tryptophan (L-trp), L-phenylalanine (L-phe) and urea (Delwiche et al., 2001, Percept. Psychophys. 63, 761-776). In the present experiment, psychophysical cross-adaptation and bitterness inhibition experiments were performed on these three compounds to determine whether the bitterness could be differentially affected by either technique. If the two experimental approaches failed to differentiate L-trp, L-phe and urea's bitterness, then we may infer they share peripheral physiological mechanisms involved in bitter taste. All compounds were intensity matched in each of 13 subjects, so the judgments of adaptation or bitterness inhibition would be based on equal initial magnitudes and, therefore, directly comparable. In the first experiment, cross-adaptation of bitterness between the amino acids was high (>80%) and reciprocal. Urea and quinine-HCl (control) did not cross-adapt with the amino acids symmetrically. In a second experiment, the sodium salts, NaCl and Na gluconate, did not differentially inhibit the bitterness of L-trp, L-phe and urea, but the control compound, MgSO4, was differentially affected. The bitter inhibition experiment supports the hypothesis that L-trp, L-phe and urea share peripheral bitter taste mechanisms, while the adaptation experiment revealed subtle differences between urea and the amino acids indicating that urea and the amino acids activate only partially overlapping bitter taste mechanisms.
Notes This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication by Chemical senses following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Keast, Russell and Breslin, Paul A. S. 2002, Cross-adaptation and bitterness inhibition of L-Tryptophan, L-Phenylalanine and urea: further support for shared peripheral physiology, Chemical senses, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 123-131. is available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/chemse/27.2.123
Language eng
Field of Research 170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2002, Oxford University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004137

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