You are not logged in.

Experimental study of ostensibly shamanic journeying imagery in naďve participants I: antecedents

Rock, Adam, Baynes, Peter and Casey, Paul 2005, Experimental study of ostensibly shamanic journeying imagery in naďve participants I: antecedents, Anthropology of consciousness, vol. 15, no. 2, Winter, pp. 72-92, doi: 10.1525/ac.2005.16.2.72.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Experimental study of ostensibly shamanic journeying imagery in naďve participants I: antecedents
Author(s) Rock, Adam
Baynes, Peter
Casey, Paul
Journal name Anthropology of consciousness
Volume number 15
Issue number 2
Season Winter
Start page 72
End page 92
Publisher University of California Press, Journals Division
Place of publication Berkeley, Calif.
Publication date 2005
ISSN 1053-4202
1556-3537
Keyword(s) shamanism
imagery
absorption
constructivism
epistemology
Summary The purpose of the present study was to investigate experimentally the antecedents of ostensibly shamanic journeying imagery associated with the Lower World in naïve participants. Forty six participants completed a composite questionnaire consisting of demographic items and the Tellegen Absorption Scale (Tellegen and Atkinson 1974). Participants were randomly assigned to one of five conditions: Harner's (1990) shamanic journeying to the Lower World instructions coupled with monotonous percussion drumming at either 4 or 8 beats-per-second for either 10 or 15 minutes; and sitting quietly with eyes closed for 15 minutes. Participants' phenomenology was retrospectively assessed using the Phenomenology of Consciousness Inventory (Pekala 1991) and a mental imagery checklist. The results indicated that there was a statistically significant difference between conditions with regards to the number of ostensibly shamanic journeying images. After adjusting for Harner's (1990) instructions, a significant main effect was found for both beats-per-second and time with regards to the number of ostensibly shamanic journeying images reported. There was a statistically significant relationship between condition and the tendency to report mental imagery associated with rocky ravines, predatory creatures, and rivers. Religious devotion was found to be a significant predictor of the number of ostensibly shamanic journeying images reported. Religious exposure and trait absorption were significant predictors of altered experience. Implications of the findings are discussed and suggestions for future research advanced.
Notes Posted online on December 12, 2006.
Language eng
DOI 10.1525/ac.2005.16.2.72
Field of Research 170299 Cognitive Science not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©American Anthropological Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004199

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 442 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 09:14:45 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.