Randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of behavioural interventions to modify cardiovascular risk factors in men and women with imparied glucose tolerance: outcomes at 6 months

Oldroyd, John Charles, Unwin, N. C., White, M., Imrie, K., Mathers, J. C. and Alberti, K. G. M. M. 2001, Randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of behavioural interventions to modify cardiovascular risk factors in men and women with imparied glucose tolerance: outcomes at 6 months, Diabetes research and clinical practice, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 29-43.

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Title Randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of behavioural interventions to modify cardiovascular risk factors in men and women with imparied glucose tolerance: outcomes at 6 months
Author(s) Oldroyd, John Charles
Unwin, N. C.
White, M.
Imrie, K.
Mathers, J. C.
Alberti, K. G. M. M.
Journal name Diabetes research and clinical practice
Volume number 52
Issue number 1
Start page 29
End page 43
Publisher Elsvier Ireland Ltd
Place of publication Shannon, Ireland
Publication date 2001-04
ISSN 0168-8227
Keyword(s) impaired glucose tolerance
diet
physical activity
type 2 diabetes
coronary heart disease
Summary Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of interventions to promote a healthy diet and physical activity in people with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Methods: A randomised controlled trial in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, 1995–98. Participants included 67 adults (38 men; 29 women) aged 24–75 years with IGT. The intervention consisted of regular diet and physical activity counselling based on the stages of change model. Main outcome measures were changes between baseline and 6 months in nutrient intake; physical activity; anthropometric and physiological measurements including serum lipids; glucose tolerance; insulin sensitivity. Results: The difference in change in total fat consumption was significant between intervention and control groups (difference −21.8 (95% confidence interval (CI) −37.8 to −5.8) g/day, P=0.008). A significantly larger proportion of intervention participants reported taking up vigorous activity than controls (difference 30.1, (95% CI 4.3–52.7)%, P=0.021). The change in body mass index was significantly different between groups (difference −0.95 (95% CI −1.5 to −0.4) kg/m2, P=0.001). There was no significant difference in change in mean 2-h plasma glucose between groups (difference −0.19 (95% CI −1.1 to 0.71) mmol/l, NS) or in serum cholesterol (difference 0.02 (95% CI −0.26 to 0.31) mmol/l, NS). The difference in change in fasting serum insulin between groups was significant (difference −3.4 (95% CI −5.8 to −1.1) mU/l, P=0.005). Conclusions: After 6 months of intensive lifestyle intervention in participants with IGT, there were changes in diet and physical activity, some cardiovascular risk factors and insulin sensitivity, but not glucose tolerance. Further follow-up is in progress to investigate whether these changes are sustained or augmented over 2 years.
Notes Available online 13 February 2001.
Language eng
Field of Research 110201 Cardiology (incl Cardiovascular Diseases)
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2001, Elsevier Science Ireland
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004273

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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