The relationship between quality of life and perceived body weight an dieting history in Dutch men and women

Burns, Cate, Tijhuis, M. A. R. and Seidell, J. C. 2001, The relationship between quality of life and perceived body weight an dieting history in Dutch men and women, International journal of obesity, vol. 25, no. 9, pp. 1386-1392.

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Title The relationship between quality of life and perceived body weight an dieting history in Dutch men and women
Author(s) Burns, Cate
Tijhuis, M. A. R.
Seidell, J. C.
Journal name International journal of obesity
Volume number 25
Issue number 9
Start page 1386
End page 1392
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2001-09
ISSN 0307-0565
1476-5497
Keyword(s) quality of life
body weight
perceived weight
dieting
Summary OBJECTIVES: (1) To study the relationship between quality of life (QoL) and measured and perceived weight and dieting history in Dutch men and women; (2) to assess the effect of weight loss over a 5 y period on QoL.

DESIGN: A cross-sectional study, in a sub-sample longitudinal over 5 y.

SUBJECTS:
A total of 2155 men and 2446 women, aged 20-59 and recruited from the general population from three towns in The Netherlands.

MEASUREMENTS: Body weight, height, self-administered questionnaire including questions concerning demographic variables and weight loss practices as part of the Dutch Monitoring project on Risk Factors for Chronic Disease (MORGEN). The Rand-36 questionnaire was used as the QoL measure.

RESULTS: In men, measured overweight (body mass index, BMI>25 kg=m2) was not associated with any dimension of QoL after adjustment for age, educational level and perceived overweight. Perceived overweight was related to reduced scores for general health and vitality. This relationship was independent of measured obesity. A history of repeated weight loss was associated with reduced scores for role functioning due to both physical and emotional problems. In women, measured overweight was significantly associated with lower scores for five out of eight QoL dimensions and perceived overweight with three: general health, vitality and physical functioning. A history of frequent weight loss was related to significantly reduced scores in six dimensions. However, only with history of frequent weight loss, and uniquely in women, was there a significant reduction in
scores on mental health and limited emotional role functioning. Measured and perceived overweight and frequent weight loss were all related to reduced scores for physical functioning. Longitudinal data indicate that in older women weight gain of 10% body weight or more was associated with a significant deterioration in QoL.

CONCLUSIONS: When looking at measures of QoL in relation to overweight it is important to separate the effects of perception of weight status and history of weight loss. We observed that the latter two factors were associated with reduced scores on several dimensions of QoL, particularly in women. These associations were observed to be independent of body weight. International Journal of Obesity (2001) 25, 1386 – 1392
Language eng
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2001, Nature Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004367

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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