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Low energy strategies for high-rise apartments in Hong Kong

Cheung, Chun K., Luther, Mark and Fuller, Robert 2002, Low energy strategies for high-rise apartments in Hong Kong, in Modern practice of architectural science : from pedagogy to andragogy? : proceedings of the 36th conference of the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association, Geelong, November, 2002., ANZAScA, [Geelong, Vic.], pp. 77-84.

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Title Low energy strategies for high-rise apartments in Hong Kong
Author(s) Cheung, Chun K.
Luther, Mark
Fuller, Robert
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association. Conference (36th : 2002 : Geelong, Vic.)
Conference location Geelong, Vic.
Conference dates 1-4 November 2002
Title of proceedings Modern practice of architectural science : from pedagogy to andragogy? : proceedings of the 36th conference of the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association, Geelong, November, 2002.
Editor(s) Luther, Mark
Publication date 2002
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association. Conference
Start page 77
End page 84
Total pages 8
Publisher ANZAScA
Place of publication [Geelong, Vic.]
Summary High-rise apartments provide 90% of the living requirements in Hong Kong. (Lam 1995) The construction material of these buildings is primarily concrete for both external wall and interior partitions with little or no thermal insulation. Due to the hot and humid climatic conditions and expectations of an ever-increasing standard of living, occupants are installing air-conditioning systems into their apartments. This has generated a tremendous electrical demand as well as an environmental (greenhouse gas emission) concern. This paper explores some of the low energy strategies that can be applied to this building typology. The effect of seven energy-saving strategies ranging from thermal insulation to different window systems and shading devices was investigated. The results show that there is the potential to reduce the annual cooling energy consumption and peak cooling load by 40% and 33% respectively.
Notes
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ISBN 9780958192507
0958192502
Language eng
Field of Research 120202 Building Science and Techniques
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2002, ANZAScA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004711

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.