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Embodied energy analysis of the refurbishment of a small detached building

Crawford, Robert, Fuller, Robert, Treloar, Graham J. and Ilozor, Ben D. 2002, Embodied energy analysis of the refurbishment of a small detached building, in Modern practice of architectural science : from pedagogy to andragogy? : proceedings of the 36th conference of the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association, Geelong, November, 2002., Deakin University, Geelong, Vic., pp. 93-100.

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Title Embodied energy analysis of the refurbishment of a small detached building
Author(s) Crawford, Robert
Fuller, Robert
Treloar, Graham J.
Ilozor, Ben D.
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association. Conference (36th : 2002 : Geelong, Vic.)
Conference location Geelong, Vic.
Conference dates 1-4 November 2002
Title of proceedings Modern practice of architectural science : from pedagogy to andragogy? : proceedings of the 36th conference of the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association, Geelong, November, 2002.
Editor(s) Luther, Mark
Publication date 2002
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association. Conference
Start page 93
End page 100
Total pages 8
Publisher Deakin University
Place of publication Geelong, Vic.
Summary Energy efficient design principles and the minimisation of operational energy requirements have been demonstrated in the refurbishment of a small existing residential building. Significant thought has been given to these areas, together with an emphasis on the minimisation of resource consumption and material wastage. However, less consideration has been given to the embodied energy of the additional materials, components and systems required to meet these aims. The additional embodied energy may reduce the advantages of minimising the operational energy consumption by extending the energy payback period beyond the life of the building. In general, the embodied energy of buildings and their products has been found to be significant, when national average input-output data is used to fill gaps in traditional life-cycle assessment inventories. Through the use of an input-outputbased hybrid embodied energy analysis, the embodied energy of this refurbished building has increased by 63% compared to the existing building, showing the impact that filling the gaps in traditional inventories can have on energy payback periods.
ISBN 0958192502
Language eng
Field of Research 120202 Building Science and Techniques
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004712

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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