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What can we learn from McLuhan? Electronic communication technologies and the future of schooling

Lynch, Julianne 2002, What can we learn from McLuhan? Electronic communication technologies and the future of schooling, in AARE 2002 : Problematic futures : educational research in an era of uncertainty ; AARE 2002 conference papers, Australian Association for Research in Education, Coldstream, Vic., pp. 1-16.

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Title What can we learn from McLuhan? Electronic communication technologies and the future of schooling
Author(s) Lynch, JulianneORCID iD for Lynch, Julianne orcid.org/0000-0003-3180-8224
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference (2002 : Brisbane, Queensland)
Conference location Brisbane, Queensland
Conference dates 1-5 December 2002
Title of proceedings AARE 2002 : Problematic futures : educational research in an era of uncertainty ; AARE 2002 conference papers
Editor(s) Jeffrey, Peter L.
Publication date 2002
Conference series Australian Association for Research in Education Conference
Start page 1
End page 16
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Coldstream, Vic.
Summary In the 1960's, Marshall McLuhan predicted that schooling, among other things, would be transformed as society embraced electronic communication technologies. McLuhan and other medium theorists provided an evocative but controversial discussion of the effects of technological development on society and its institutions. McLuhan's ideas were widely criticised by his contemporaries, particularly educationalists; however, his ideas are not so radical today and visions similar to those formulated by McLuhan can now be found in mainstream educational literature. Predictions made by medium theorists about the future of schooling are consistent with both the reforms advocated by current-day educationalists and the speculations of technologists.

In this paper, I revisit McLuhan's predictions for the future of education. I then draw parallels between McLuhan's vision and those espoused by contemporary educationalists. I argue that, although McLuhan's predictions have re-emerged, his analysis of the interaction between new technologies and old ways of doing have not re-emerged to the same extent, with many commentators neglecting to take account of the resilience of the institutionalised practices, structures and roles of traditional schooling.
ISSN 1324-9320
Language eng
Field of Research 130306 Educational Technology and Computing
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2002, AARE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004840

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