Truth is God harm minimization through the practice of ecologically sustainable design and buddhism

Mellersh-Lucas, Su 2002, Truth is God harm minimization through the practice of ecologically sustainable design and buddhism, in Modern practice of architectural science : from pedagogy to andragogy? : proceedings of the 36th conference of the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association, Geelong, 1st to 4th November, 2002., Deakin University, School of Architecture & Building, Geelong, Vic., pp. 313-320.


Title Truth is God harm minimization through the practice of ecologically sustainable design and buddhism
Author(s) Mellersh-Lucas, Su
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association. Conference (36th : 2002 : Geelong, Vic.)
Conference location Geelong, Australia
Conference dates 1-4 Nov. 2002
Title of proceedings Modern practice of architectural science : from pedagogy to andragogy? : proceedings of the 36th conference of the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association, Geelong, 1st to 4th November, 2002.
Editor(s) Luther, Mark
Publication date 2002
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association. Conference
Start page 313
End page 320
Publisher Deakin University, School of Architecture & Building
Place of publication Geelong, Vic.
Summary The emergence of the global ecological crisis is presenting unique opportunities for the coordination of ethical thinking across cultural boundaries. Harm minimization as an ethical imperative operates as the ‘modus operandi’ behind both Ecologically Sustainable Design (ESD) and Buddhist practice. The architectural response to ESD is founded upon the ‘Declaration of Interdependence for a Sustainable Future’ adopted in 1993 by the International Union of Architects, of which the RAIA is a member.

Buddhism is a response to existential concerns universal to humanity. It developed as a set of principles for personal transformation known as the Four Noble Truths elucidated two and a half thousand years ago. Buddhist meditation practise ‘interrupts automatic patterns of conditioned behaviour’ recognised as the major obstacle to be overcome in any programme for change. Unsustainable egocentric behaviour is considered fundamental to our global ecological crisis and calls for radical behavioural change are increasingly being heard at the professional as well as the personal level. Emerging synergies between the Western cognitive sciences and Buddhist study of the mind increasingly validate the Tibetan Buddhist mind development phenomenon. Buddhists argue that their programme for enhancing ethical behaviour through mind development is a step-by step process of observation and analysis built upon empirical observation – a fundamental pre-requisite of any ‘scientific’ enquiry. Collaborative research programmes currently underway are an attempt to re-interpret Buddhist meditation techniques within a framework acceptable to Western scientific understanding. A truly holistic approach to harm minimization requires its consideration.
ISBN 09581192502
Language eng
Field of Research 120202 Building Science and Techniques
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004898

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Citation only collection - Science, Engineering & Built Environment
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