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Integrating the conceptual and practice worlds : a case study from Architecture

Challis, D. 2002, Integrating the conceptual and practice worlds : a case study from Architecture, in HERDSA 2002 : Quality Conversations : Annual International Conference of the Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia, HERDSA, Jamison Centre, A.C.T., pp. 106-113.

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Title Integrating the conceptual and practice worlds : a case study from Architecture
Author(s) Challis, D.
Conference name International Conference of the Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (2002 : Perth, W.A.)
Conference location Perth, W.A.
Conference dates 7-10 Jul. 2002
Title of proceedings HERDSA 2002 : Quality Conversations : Annual International Conference of the Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia
Editor(s) Goody, Allan
Herrington, Jan
Northcote, Maria
Publication date 2002
Start page 106
End page 113
Publisher HERDSA
Place of publication Jamison Centre, A.C.T.
Summary A compelling challenge for tertiary educators is to respond meaningfully to pressures to provide curricula that translate readily into realworld professional experience. To explore the synergies of an integration of the conceptual and practice worlds, this paper draws on a program, which the author evaluated, that was part of a Committee for University Teaching and Staff Development funded project for students of architecture and construction. The aspect discussed here, Composing Architecture—The Music Room, involved 74 second year students at Deakin University in semester 2, 2001. The case study is used as an illustration of curriculum design, including assessment, to explore how it met the aims of creating learning experiences that were purposeful, rich in their complexity, and mirrored the demands of the profession in a supportive environment that fostered development. One of the major aims was to model professional practice within the academy—in a sense, to enter into a dialogue between the academy and the profession—with the quality of that dialogue being determined by the accuracy or authenticity of the modelling. With this focus, having articulated and discussed the stated educational challenge that this project was intended to meet, the paper tests this against the attributes of authenticity in the environment of education as delineated by Martin-Kniep (2000) and, in so doing, questions some of her claims. Although some theorists (eg, Petraglia, 1998) contend that to prescribe what counts for authenticity is impossible, it is hoped that some insights into linking the academy and the profession will be gained.
ISBN 0908557515
Language eng
Field of Research 080706 Librarianship
Socio Economic Objective 890302 Library and Archival Services
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2002, HERDSA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004916

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Learning Services
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