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Cross cultural engagement: teaching African music to Australian students

Joseph, Dawn Y. 2003, Cross cultural engagement: teaching African music to Australian students, in Proceedings of the 4th Asia-Pacific Symposium on Music Education Research, Department of Creative Arts, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong, pp. 142-147.

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Title Cross cultural engagement: teaching African music to Australian students
Author(s) Joseph, Dawn Y.ORCID iD for Joseph, Dawn Y. orcid.org/0000-0002-6320-900X
Conference name APSMER 2003. Asia-Pacific Symposium on Music Education Research (4th : 2003 : Hong Kong, China)
Conference location Hong Kong, China
Conference dates 9 - 12 July 2003
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the 4th Asia-Pacific Symposium on Music Education Research
Editor(s) Yip, Lai-chi Rita
Leung, Chi-cheung
Lau, Wai Tong
Publication date 2003
Conference series Asia-Pacific Symposium on Music Education Research
Start page 142
End page 147
Total pages 6 p.
Publisher Department of Creative Arts, The Hong Kong Institute of Education
Place of publication Hong Kong
Keyword(s) Music -- Instruction and study -- Congresses
Summary This paper reports on research that examined the effectiveness of introducing rhythmic concepts through an unfamiliar musical genre to Australian generalist prim my teacher education students. The genre selected was African music, in particular action songs, dance and instrumental improvisation. The methodologies of Orff, Kodaly and Dalcroze were taught through the repertoire of African music in order to foster a closer relationship between pedagogical theory and practice and to teach rhythm through cross-cultural engagement. Through analyses of questionnaire and interview data, it was demonstrated that African music had a positive effect on students' conjidence as non-specialists music teachers and enhanced their skills in staff, sol-fa, hand notation and performance. Also students were not only highly motivated to engage with this new musical genre, but also gained an increased understanding of African culture. It is argued that African music was perceived by students not so much as a "novelty", but as a source of genuine motivation, interest and enjoyment. Its potential for extending student understanding of rhythm as well as taking a significant step towards internationalizing the curriculum for a cohort of predominantly Anglo-Celtic, pre-service teachers is also explored.
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ISBN 9629491346
9789629491345
Language eng
Field of Research 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2003, The Hong Kong Institute of Education
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004930

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Social and Cultural Studies in Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.