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Habitat manipulation and rodent damage control: reducing rodent damage in Australian macadamia orchards

White, John, Wilson, John and Horskins, Kerrilee 2003, Habitat manipulation and rodent damage control: reducing rodent damage in Australian macadamia orchards, in Rats, mice and people : rodent biology and management, Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research, Canberra, A.C.T, pp. 213-216.

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Title Habitat manipulation and rodent damage control: reducing rodent damage in Australian macadamia orchards
Author(s) White, JohnORCID iD for White, John orcid.org/0000-0002-7375-5944
Wilson, John
Horskins, Kerrilee
Conference name Rodent Biology and Management. Conference (2nd : 2003 : Canberra, A.C.T.)
Conference location Canberra, A.C.T.
Conference dates 10-14 Feb. 2003
Title of proceedings Rats, mice and people : rodent biology and management
Editor(s) Singleton, Grant
Hinds, Lyn
Krebs, Charles
Splatt, Dave
Publication date 2003
Conference series Rodent Biology and Management Conference
Start page 213
End page 216
Publisher Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research
Place of publication Canberra, A.C.T
Summary This paper examines the relationship between adjacent non-crop vegetation and rodent (Rattus rattus) damage in Australian macadamia (Macadamia integrifolia) orchard systems. Orchards adjacent to structurally diverse, non-crop vegetation dominated by woody weeds exhibited significantly higher damage when compared to orchards adjacent to managed grasslands. This relationship formed the basis for a rodent damage reduction strategy utilising habitat manipulation. Structurally diverse, non-crop habitats were modified to grasslands leading to a reduction in rodent damage of 65%. This strategy was cost-effective and has the potential to be long-term with minimal effort needed to maintain sites in a modified state. Habitat manipulation is a process whereby the resource load in a system is reduced and hence rodent densities cannot reach levels where they cause significant crop damage. This paper provides empirical evidence to support habitat manipulation as a practical, cost-effective control strategy for rodent pests.
ISBN 1863203567
9781863203562
Language eng
Field of Research 070106 Farm Management, Rural Management and Agribusiness
Socio Economic Objective 970107 Expanding Knowledge in the Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2003 Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004938

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