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Place, progress and memory : McGlashan and Everist at Geelong College

Trimble, Judith 2002, Place, progress and memory : McGlashan and Everist at Geelong College, in The Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Conference of the Society of Architectual Historians Australia and New Zealand, Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, Sydney, N.S.W., pp. 321-325.

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Title Place, progress and memory : McGlashan and Everist at Geelong College
Author(s) Trimble, Judith
Conference name Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand. Conference (20th : 2002 : Sydney, N.S.W.)
Conference location Sydney, N.S.W.
Conference dates 3-5 Oct. 2002
Title of proceedings The Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Conference of the Society of Architectual Historians Australia and New Zealand
Editor(s) Gusheh, Maryam
Stead, Naomi
Publication date 2002
Conference series Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand. Conference
Start page 321
End page 325
Total pages 5 p.
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Summary Building in an historical setting engages the problem of progress and authentic dialogue between tradition, contemporaneity and visions of a future. Since 1960, McGlashan and Everist have been the sole architects for Geelong College's Talbot Street campus, established in 1871. They have designed its master plans and all new buildings and alterations to the existing eclectic stock. As modernists with a task providing no opportunity for stylistic coherence in an age of universality, the architects were caught between protecting the College's perceived authenticity by continuing its historicist links with English collegiate architecture on the one hand, and their own modernist ethic on the other. Adopting what Frampton has called in his essay, 'Critical Regionalism', an 'arriere-garde' position (an 'identity-giving culture' rather than reversion to the past or to the 'Enlightenment myth of progress'), the architects avoid overt display of nostalgic historicism, modernist tectonics and populism. This paper asks whether and to what extent they have been capable of an authentic dialogue. Have they created an existential place in an 'architecture of resistance' as Frampton would have it, attending sufficiently to 'identity-giving culture' and the future? What is the role of implacement in the problematic of 'progress' in this context and how might it have affected a particular approach and the outcome?
ISBN 1864875747
9781864875744
Language eng
Field of Research 120103 Architectural History and Theory
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2003
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004941

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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