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What is the position/contribution of biology in environmental education

Robottom, Ian 2002, What is the position/contribution of biology in environmental education, in Biology education for the real world: student-teacher-citizen: proceedings of the the IVth ERIDOB conference, Ecole nationale de formation agronomique, Toulouse-Auzeville, France, pp. 27-42.

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Title What is the position/contribution of biology in environmental education
Author(s) Robottom, Ian
Conference name Conference of European Researchers in Didactic of Biology (4th : 2002 : Toulouse, France )
Conference location Toulouse, France
Conference dates 22 - 26 October 2002
Title of proceedings Biology education for the real world: student-teacher-citizen: proceedings of the the IVth ERIDOB conference
Editor(s) Lewis, Jenny
Magro, Alexandra
Simonneaux, Laurence
Publication date 2002
Conference series European Researchers in Didactic of Biology Conference
Start page 27
End page 42
Publisher Ecole nationale de formation agronomique
Place of publication Toulouse-Auzeville, France
Summary In this paper I intend to argue that biological science education and environmental education have traditionally represented fundamentally different discourses - that they have explicitly or implicitly adopted different epistemologies and ontologies - and that this difference has had implications for the conduct of research in these fields. I will draw on recent developments in theory, policy and practice in the field of environmental education to argue that this field tends to be located within a social discourse - that there is a foundation in policy and practice for considering environmental issues as fundamentally social and ethical in nature, rather than in some sense objectively existing. I then consider a rising topic in biology education (that of Biotechnology) as one which while tending to be treated within a scientific discourse, would be more fully explored educationally within a social discourse. I conclude by suggesting that in biology education research we need to consider a reconciliation of these historically differing perspectives.
Notes
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Language eng
Field of Research 130212 Science, Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogy
139999 Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2003
Copyright notice ©2002, ENFA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30004958

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.