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Of great love and immense hate: the ambivalence of the other in a local/global school

Arber, Ruth 2003, Of great love and immense hate: the ambivalence of the other in a local/global school, in Teachers as leaders: teacher education for a global profession: ICET 2003 International yearbook on teacher education, 48th world assembly, International Council on Education for Teaching at National-Louis University, [Wheeling, Ill.], pp. 1-20.

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Title Of great love and immense hate: the ambivalence of the other in a local/global school
Author(s) Arber, Ruth
Conference name ICET World Assembly (48th : 2003 : Melbourne, Australia)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 20 - 25 July 2003
Title of proceedings Teachers as leaders: teacher education for a global profession: ICET 2003 International yearbook on teacher education, 48th world assembly
Editor(s) Townsend, T.
Publication date 2003
Start page 1
End page 20
Publisher International Council on Education for Teaching at National-Louis University
Place of publication [Wheeling, Ill.]
Summary In recent times, and in times of insurgent globalisation, modern notions of identity and with them, conceptions of essential and primordially defined difference seem to have fallen apart. Identity is understood as post-modern, a ‘moveable feast’ of ever-in-process, negotiated differences. The examination of the material and conceptual terms and conditions that position these logics otherwise suggests that these arguments remain tied within conceptions of ourselves made through the ambivalent conceptions of others. In this paper, I trace these paradoxical relations as they are represented in a particular local Melbourne school at each end of a decade and at a time of increasing demographic change and global transformation. Teachers and parents understood and defined their identities and the identities of others in ways that were increasingly fragmented, changing and complex. Beneath these changing patterns, they continued to define others as different and as not us in ways that were ambivalent and extreme. These negotiations took place differently in recent years as the definitions of essential notions of identity changed and became more complex to define. Nevertheless, they continued as ambivalent stories of otherness that transversed the tortuous spectrum between orientalism and nativism speculated upon in post-colonial writings.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 130299 Curriculum and Pedagogy not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2003, ICET
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005028

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Social and Cultural Studies in Education
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