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Beyond the gap: great liberation through architectural design teaching in the bardo?

Beynon, David 2003, Beyond the gap: great liberation through architectural design teaching in the bardo?, in Design + research project based research in architecture, The Association, Melbourne, Vic..

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Title Beyond the gap: great liberation through architectural design teaching in the bardo?
Author(s) Beynon, David
Conference name Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia. International Conference (2nd : 2003 : Melbourne, Victoria)
Conference location Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 28-30 September 2003
Title of proceedings Design + research project based research in architecture
Editor(s) Newton, Clare
Kaji O'Grady, Sandra
Wollan,Simon
Publication date 2003
Conference series Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia International Conference
Publisher The Association
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary Tibetan Buddhists articulate the bardo as the gap that exists between one fundamental stage of existence and another. Its most common usage is to describe the interval between death and reincarnation, but more literally, bar means 'in-between' and do 'island' or 'mark'. The 'bardo experience' is thus any one in which the 'past situation has just occurred and the future situation has not yet manifested itself. Instruction in architectural design attempts to provide guidance in the process of guiding students across the bardo from intention, analysis, and theorisation, to the creation of architectural representations and products. As such the architectural academy operates within a history of methods and codifications which try to quantify and bring a level of certainty to this process.
Recently however, there has been a questioning of traditionally accepted ways of ‘knowing’ the world, which has manifested in challenges to received ‘truths’ and increasing interest in other, previously marginalised histories and knowledges. The critiques that flow from this questioning contend that objective cultural ‘truths’ are simply the discursive result of the dominance of particular ways of perceiving the world. The practice of architecture has not been immune from this. The field has become a subject, for instance, of sociological, feminist and postcolonial critiques. However, their bearing on the pedagogy of composing architecture remains fragmentary and contested. My interest in this subject is derived from a desire to use the opportunities presented by contemporary cultural shifts to develop design-based architectural research that will assist future architects to operate in the uncertainties of an irreducibly plural global community. This paper will explore some ways in which academic research might bear upon the design studio’s negotiation of architectural bardos.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 120101 Architectural Design
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2003, Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005081

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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