Dwelling in the landscape: from Blairgowrie House to Portsea Palace

de Jong, Ursula 2003, Dwelling in the landscape: from Blairgowrie House to Portsea Palace, in 20th annual conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand, Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, Sydney, N.S.W., pp. 80-87.

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Title Dwelling in the landscape: from Blairgowrie House to Portsea Palace
Author(s) de Jong, Ursula
Conference name Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand. Conference (20th : 2003 : Sydney, N.S.W.)
Conference location Sydney, New South Wales
Conference dates 2-5 Oct. 2003
Title of proceedings 20th annual conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand
Editor(s) Gusheh, Maryam
Stead, Naomi
Publication date 2003
Conference series Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand Conference
Start page 80
End page 87
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Summary Ackerman begins his book "The Villa" (1995) with these words: 'A villa is a building in the country designed for its owner's enjoyment and relaxation .... [it] accommodates a fantasy which is impervious to reality.' He concludes: , ... the country, in exacting confrontations with the immanent brute forces and sensuous enchantments of nature, prompts inspired responses.' Blairgowrie House - the villa in the landscape - was built in the 1870s and the 'Portsea Palace' - a personal club med resort - in the late 1990s. The notion of an inspired response and the concept of dwelling poetically are manifestly absent in the Portsea Palace. Why?

This paper explores architecture and landscape - particularly 'domestic' architecture and coastal landscapes in Victoria's Nepean Peninsula. It looks closely at what architects mean when they say their design reflects place, relates to site, is climate specific, is close to nature, responds to the landscape, and/or is sensitive to the environment. Exemplars from different centuries are examined in their philosophical contexts and frames of reference. The complexities of the notion of place and identity, belonging, and dwelling (in the Heideggerian sense) are examined to identify the shift that has occurred over time as science and technology have ostensibly freed 'modern man' from 'a direct dependence on places' (Norberg Schultz). The alienation and loss that has eventuated - for humans and for the environment - will be critically analysed and assessed.
ISBN 1864875747
9781864875744
Language eng
Field of Research 120103 Architectural History and Theory
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005104

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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