The robustness of the behavioural-intentions battery in services scenarios

McQuilken, Lisa and Shaw, Robin 2003, The robustness of the behavioural-intentions battery in services scenarios, in ANZMAC 2003 : a celebrations of Ehrenberg and Bass : marketing discoveries, knowledge and contribution, conference proceedings, ANZMAC, Dunedin, N.Z., pp. 2190-2196.

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Title The robustness of the behavioural-intentions battery in services scenarios
Author(s) McQuilken, Lisa
Shaw, Robin
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy. Conference (2003: Adelaide, South Australia)
Conference location Adelaide, South Australia
Conference dates 1-3 Dec. 2003
Title of proceedings ANZMAC 2003 : a celebrations of Ehrenberg and Bass : marketing discoveries, knowledge and contribution, conference proceedings
Editor(s) Kennedy, Rachel
Publication date 2003
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference
Start page 2190
End page 2196
Total pages 7
Publisher ANZMAC
Place of publication Dunedin, N.Z.
Summary The consensus among researchers is that loyalty is a very complex construct (Javalgi & Moberg 1997). Various typologies have been developed to measure the loyalty construct (e.g., Curassi and Kennedy 2002; Hoare 2000; Knox 1998; Zeithaml, Parasuraman & Berry 1996). Zeithaml, Berry & Parasuraman (1996) developed a service loyalty framework comprising 13 items across five dimensions: “loyalty”, “switch”, “pay more”, “external responses”, and “internal responses”. This framework was criticised by Bloemer, de Ruyter & Wetzels (1999) for having conceptual and empirical limitations. Upon re-examination of the same 13 items, they concluded that the loyalty construct comprised only four factors: “word-of-mouth”, “purchase intentions”, “price sensitivity”, and “complaining behaviour”. Questions remain as to the precise dimensionality of the service loyalty construct as proposed by Zeithaml, Parasuraman & Berry (1996), and its stability or robustness generically, i.e., to what extent is there an invariant factor structure across the range of marketing contexts to which the battery may be applied? This paper reports on the testing of the goodness-of-fit of the five and fourfactor models to data collected in a study of consumer reaction to the service supplied by an Australian Internet Service Provider (ISP), through a series of hypothetical scenarios. In addition, comparisons were conducted with the results of exploratory factor analyses of the eight scenarios. The results suggested that factor structures are unstable across the data subsets, thereby limiting the generalisability and utility of the proposed models.
ISBN 0868039837
9780868039831
Language eng
Field of Research 150502 Marketing Communications
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2003, ANZMAC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005174

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Management and Marketing
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