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Women in research? Investigating research opportunities for female academics in Australia

Blunsdon, Betsy and McNeil, Nicola 2003, Women in research? Investigating research opportunities for female academics in Australia, in Discovery 2003 Women in Research Conference Proceedings, Women in Research, Rockhampton Branch, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Qld., pp. 1-11.

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Title Women in research? Investigating research opportunities for female academics in Australia
Author(s) Blunsdon, Betsy
McNeil, Nicola
Conference name Women in Research Conference (2003 : Rockhampton, Qld.)
Conference location Rockhampton, Queensland
Conference dates 13-14 November 2003
Title of proceedings Discovery 2003 Women in Research Conference Proceedings
Editor(s) Moxham, L
Douglas, K.M.
Dwyer, T
Walker, S
Wooller, J
Cornelius, M.W.
Publication date 2003
Start page 1
End page 11
Publisher Women in Research, Rockhampton Branch, Central Queensland University
Place of publication Rockhampton, Qld.
Summary Women continue to be surprisingly under-represented in academia, given the increasing numbers of female postgraduate students and the flexible working conditions offered by most Australian Universities. To date, research has emphasised multiple causes for the 'gender gap' in academia, including the structural characteristics of the university system, cultural and societal barriers to the advancement of women, the influence of marital status on the productivity of women academics and the interaction of cultural, social and personality factors on women's professional careers. However, the implications of a 'gender gap' in academic rank reach beyond arguments of equality between sexes, to questions regarding consequences of a male-dominated professoriate to the nature and subjects of academic research in Australia. The aim of this paper is to investigate the factors that determine the rank of Australian academics and in part, to investigate whether there is a gender gap of rank or authority, through an analysis of data collected on all Australian academics by the Federal Department of Education, Science and Training. The implications of these findings on opportunities for female academic researchers and for research outcomes will be discussed.
ISBN 1876674660
9781876674663
Language eng
Field of Research 150305 Human Resources Management
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005202

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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