Community valuations of historic pocket parks: a Melbourne study

Nichols, David and Freestone, Robert 2003, Community valuations of historic pocket parks: a Melbourne study, in Leisure, Change and Diversity- 6th Biennial Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Leisure Studies, Australian and New Zealand Association for Leisure Studies, Lindfield, N.S.W., pp. 64-79.

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Title Community valuations of historic pocket parks: a Melbourne study
Author(s) Nichols, David
Freestone, Robert
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Association for Leisure Studies. Conference (6th: 2003: Sydney , N.S.W.)
Conference location School of Leisure Sport and Tourism University of Technology, Sydney
Conference dates 10 -12 July 2003
Title of proceedings Leisure, Change and Diversity- 6th Biennial Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Leisure Studies
Editor(s) Veal, A.J.
Simpson, Clare
Jenkins, John
Publication date 2003
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Association for Leisure Studies Conference
Start page 64
End page 79
Publisher Australian and New Zealand Association for Leisure Studies
Place of publication Lindfield, N.S.W.
Summary The internal reserve, an historic form of planned open space creating semi-private parks at the rear of residential allotments and without street frontages, can be found in Australian suburban areas of diverse socio-economic status. Internal reserves commonly express the idealism of the early town planning movement, which envisaged the internal reserve as an embedded community-building mechanism with multiple potential uses. En vogue from 1910-1930, the internal reserve concept proved problematical from the outset. Even today, while many residents agree that their reserves are responsible for the special nature of their domestic environment, others are apprehensive about safety, maintenance and custodianship. Two surveys of residents living around internal reserves in four Melbourne suburbs, conducted in 1979 and 2002, reveal a variety of opinions on the potential and importance of these spaces. Local communities were found for the most part to have negative and ambiguous perceptions of these reserves. With one exception, residents did not value the parks highly as community spaces and alternative uses may need to be explored. The results suggest that a more innovative set of tools and incentives may be needed to reinvigorate the internal reserve as a significant recreation resource for local communities.
Language eng
Field of Research 120103 Architectural History and Theory
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2003, Australian and New Zealand Association for Leisure Studies
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005214

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Social and International Studies
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