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Geographical dislocation and adjustment in university students: the impact of attachment, autonomy and coping behaviour on stress and well-being

Stewart, Janice and Podbury, J. 2003, Geographical dislocation and adjustment in university students: the impact of attachment, autonomy and coping behaviour on stress and well-being, in Relationships : family, work and community : proceedings of the 3rd Annual Australasian Psychology of Relationships Conference, 15-16th November, 2003, Australian Psychological Society, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 102-108.

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Title Geographical dislocation and adjustment in university students: the impact of attachment, autonomy and coping behaviour on stress and well-being
Author(s) Stewart, Janice
Podbury, J.
Conference name Australasian Psychology of Relationships. Conference (3rd : 2003 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 15-16 Nov. 2003
Title of proceedings Relationships : family, work and community : proceedings of the 3rd Annual Australasian Psychology of Relationships Conference, 15-16th November, 2003
Editor(s) Moore, Kathleen A.
Publication date 2003
Conference series Australasian Psychology of Relationships Conference
Start page 102
End page 108
Publisher Australian Psychological Society
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary The relative contribution of geographical dislocation, attachment styles, coping behaviours, and autonomy, to successful student adjustment, was examined in relation to stress and well-being. A sample of 142 on campus first year university students, across four Victorian university campuses completed self-report questionnaires. Questionnaires included demographic, social network, intrapsychic (attachment and autonomy), and coping variables. Multiple regression analysis revealed that being female, not having made a friend to confide in personal matters, lower achieved autonomy, and use of emotion-focused coping predicted higher levels of student stress. A second multiple regression analysis revealed that living away from home, and preferring others to approach oneself to initiate conversation or friendships predicted lower well-being, whilst increased frequency of phone and email contact, and greater secure parent and peer attachment, predicted greater well-being. Pearson's correlations indicated that securely attached students used more problem focused coping and social support, whereas insecurely attached students used more emotion focused coping. Qualitative data indicated student concerns about being away from family and friends, finance, course direction and structure, social opportunities on campus, and generally adjusting to the university culture. It was concluded that first year on-campus students would benefit from program initiatives targeting enhancement of on-campus social opportunities, development of autonomy, problem focused coping behaviour, interpersonal and social assertiveness.
ISBN 0909881243
9780909881245
Language eng
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005217

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.