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Digital TV in Australia and the USA: a cross-impact analysis of the adoption and diffusion of digital TV in Australia and the United States

Weerakkody, Niranjala and Tremblay, W. 2003, Digital TV in Australia and the USA: a cross-impact analysis of the adoption and diffusion of digital TV in Australia and the United States, in ANZCA 2003 Conference Proceedings : Designing Communication for Diversity, Australian and New Zealand Communication Association, Queensland University of Technology, pp. 1-14.

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Title Digital TV in Australia and the USA: a cross-impact analysis of the adoption and diffusion of digital TV in Australia and the United States
Author(s) Weerakkody, Niranjala
Tremblay, W.
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Communication Association. Conference (2003 : Brisbane, Qld.)
Conference location Queensland University of Technology, Gardens Point Campus, Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 9-11 July 2003
Title of proceedings ANZCA 2003 Conference Proceedings : Designing Communication for Diversity
Editor(s) Hatcher, Caroline
Flew, Terry
Jacobs, Joanne
Publication date 2003
Start page 1
End page 14
Publisher Australian and New Zealand Communication Association
Place of publication Queensland University of Technology
Summary The paper examines the adoption and diffusion of Digital Television (DTV) in Australia and the United States, identifying historical, technical, regulatory, marketing, and other commonalities and differences that appear to be most significant to its adoption, as both countries have experienced a 'sluggish' diffusion and adoption of DTV so far. Using library research and borrowing the cross-impact matrix method from futures research, the authors develop J J events related to the various influences and groups of stakeholders that had shaped the policy making and adoption of DTV. We then carry out a comparative analysis between the two countries to make evident their impacts, strengths, and directions of influence. The authors suggest that the implementation of DTV in these two developed countries appears to be nearly identical. Even though Australian and US broadcasting models are fundamentally different, the diffusion process for DTV is primarily affected by the nature of digital technology and globalisation, two trends that may be diminishing the import of the nation-state in the technology adoption process. The paper concludes that these broader economic and technical events may have greater import to DTV's successful diffusion than do traditional, cultural, and nationalistic factors suggested in earlier comparative broadcast studies.
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ISBN 0646422138
Language eng
Field of Research 100599 Communications Technologies not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2003, ANZCA
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005233

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.