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More dominant in their inactivity: consumer response and the adoption of digital TV in Australia

Weerakkody, Niranjala 2003, More dominant in their inactivity: consumer response and the adoption of digital TV in Australia, in Proceedings of the 2003 Informing Science and Information Technology Education Joint Conference (INSITE 2003), Santa Rosa, Calif., Informing Science Institute, pp. 1019-1029.

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Title More dominant in their inactivity: consumer response and the adoption of digital TV in Australia
Author(s) Weerakkody, Niranjala
Conference name Informing Science and IT Education Conference (2003 : Pori, Finland)
Conference location Pori, Finland
Conference dates 24-27 June 2003
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the 2003 Informing Science and Information Technology Education Joint Conference (INSITE 2003)
Editor(s) Cohen, Eli B.
Publication date 2003
Start page 1019
End page 1029
Publisher Santa Rosa, Calif.
Place of publication Informing Science Institute
Keyword(s) digital TV
Australian broadcasting
adoption and diffusion of digital TV
broadcasting policy and regulation
diffusion of innovations
digital broadcasting in Australia
broadcast spectrum allocation
protectionism in broadcasting policy
Australian broadcasting policy
consumer response to new technology
Summary After much hesitation, discussion, and power brokering, Australia adopted digital TV for its Free-to air broadcasting on January 1, 2001. However, by December 2002, only a few thousand homes had adopted the technology. This paper examines the implementation and regulation of digital TV in Australia from the point of view of the ‘established base’ the new technology will replace, theories on diffusion and innovation of new technologies, and the Justification Model, which sees technology choice as social gambling. It then evaluates the various protectionist regulations and limitations imposed on the technology to safeguard the various stakeholders, the implementation strategies used, lack of digital content, marketing efforts, negative media coverage, and the economic realities of the technology, and argues that if consumers reject the technology altogether, it would lead to Australia missing the future applications of digital technology and the opportunity to address the issue of the ‘digital divide’ in the 21st century.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISSN 1547-5840
1547-5859
1547-5867
Language eng
Field of Research 169999 Studies in Human Society not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005234

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.