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Factors associated with successful ageing

Knight, Tess and Ricciardelli, Lina 2004, Factors associated with successful ageing, in ERA 2004 : Contibuting to an ageing agenda : abstracts and proceedings : the 3rd National Conference for Emerging Researchers in Ageing, 2nd December 2004 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, University of Queensland, Australasian Centre on Ageing, Brisbane, Qld., pp. 123-129.

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Title Factors associated with successful ageing
Author(s) Knight, Tess
Ricciardelli, Lina
Conference name National Conference for Emerging Researchers in Ageing (3rd : 2004 : Brisbane, Queensland)
Conference location Brisbane, Queensland
Conference dates 2 December 2004
Title of proceedings ERA 2004 : Contibuting to an ageing agenda : abstracts and proceedings : the 3rd National Conference for Emerging Researchers in Ageing, 2nd December 2004 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre
Editor(s) Underwood, Mair
Publication date 2004
Conference series National Conference for Emerging Researchers in Ageing
Start page 123
End page 129
Publisher University of Queensland, Australasian Centre on Ageing
Place of publication Brisbane, Qld.
Summary This research explored the extent to which adaptability, self-acceptance, religiosity, attitudes to ageing, and flexibility are associated with seven criteria of successful ageing (health, activity, life satisfaction, personal growth, positive relationships, autonomy, and purpose in life). Also considered was the level of importance participants assigned to these criteria. The participants were 200 females and 140 males aged between 70 and 95 years. Structural equation modelling was employed to determine significant paths between the variables. Direct and mediating effects of older adults’ importance ratings for different criteria of successful ageing were analysed. The main factors associated with successful ageing were self-acceptance and flexibility, both of which contributed significantly to almost all of the criteria examined. Importance ratings did not play a mediating role. It was concluded that self-acceptance and flexibility might enhance the process of successful ageing and could be targeted in programmes that assist older adults to adjust to life changes.
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ISBN 1864997931
9781864997934
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2004, The University of Queensland
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005367

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Psychology
Higher Education Research Group
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.