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A new relationship between planning and democracy? Urban activism in Melbourne 1965-1975

Howe, Renate and Nichols, David 2004, A new relationship between planning and democracy? Urban activism in Melbourne 1965-1975, in Planning models and the culture of cities : Proceedings of the 11th International Planning History Conference 2004, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Catalunya, Spain, pp. 1-11.

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Title A new relationship between planning and democracy? Urban activism in Melbourne 1965-1975
Author(s) Howe, Renate
Nichols, David
Conference name International Planning History Society (11th : 2004, Barcelona, Spain)
Conference location Barcelona, Spain
Conference dates 14- 17 July 2004
Title of proceedings Planning models and the culture of cities : Proceedings of the 11th International Planning History Conference 2004
Editor(s) Monclus, Francisco-Javier
Guardia, Manuel
Publication date 2004
Conference series International Planning History Conference
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya
Place of publication Catalunya, Spain
Summary This paper is a reflective overview of urban social protest in the years 1965-1975 and its influence on post-war planning, especially on models of public participation in planning, and conceptions of effective local democracy. Drawing extensively on a major study of urban activism in Melbourne, Australia, the paper discusses the political and organisational strategies used by activists in Melbourne’s inner city areas to resist the large-scale planning/urban renewal projects especially of the Victorian state government. The paper focuses on Melbourne’s inner city Residents’ Action Groups and examines their motivations, strategies and rationales, placing them within an international context of urban protest movements demanding local democracy and consultation. The paper concludes that the Melbourne urban protest movements of the late 60s and early 70s deserve recognition for their contribution to inclusive, consultative processes in planning decision-making. This is done within a context of questioning contemporary academic discussion around the interpretative concept of gentrification, widely and indiscriminately applied to this and later periods of urban change.
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ISBN 8460801551
9788460801559
Language eng
Field of Research 210303 Australian History (excl Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander History)
Socio Economic Objective 970121 Expanding Knowledge in History and Archaeology
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2004, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005403

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Social and International Studies
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.