Openly accessible

The need to vent and dissatisfactory self-service technology encounters

Robertson, Nichola and Shaw, Robin 2004, The need to vent and dissatisfactory self-service technology encounters, in ANZMAC 2004 : marketing accountabilities and responsibilities, conference proceedings, ANZMAC, Dunedin, N.Z..

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
robertson-needtovent-2004.pdf Published version application/pdf 101.02KB 210

Title The need to vent and dissatisfactory self-service technology encounters
Author(s) Robertson, Nichola
Shaw, Robin
Conference name Australian & New Zealand Marketing Academy. Conference (2004 : Victoria University of Wellington)
Conference location Wellington, New Zealand
Conference dates 29 November-1 December 2004
Title of proceedings ANZMAC 2004 : marketing accountabilities and responsibilities, conference proceedings
Editor(s) Wiley, Jim
Thirkell, Peter
Publication date 2004
Total pages 7
Publisher ANZMAC
Place of publication Dunedin, N.Z.
Keyword(s) self-service technologies (SSTs)
customer complaint behaviours (CCBs)
customer venting
Summary Reports of customer dissatisfaction with self-service technologies (SSTs) are becoming increasingly common. The SST context is characterised by customer participation in service production and delivery, independently of service personnel. With no opportunity for humanto- human interaction, feelings of customer irritation and frustration can have a tendency to build-up in dissatisfactory SST encounters. If SSTs do not perform as promised, customers can become angry and frustrated, and do not have the security or reassurance of human service personnel. With this in mind, it is argued that customers’ “need to vent” will be an important predictor of customers’ complaint behaviours (CCBs), i.e., voice, negative word of mouth, negative “word of mouse”, third party action, false loyalty and exit, in dissatisfactory SST encounters. The “need to vent” is defined as the need, when one has a problem, to seek relief by expressing one’s problem / “getting it off one’s chest”. This construct has been subject to little conceptual or empirical scrutiny, and to the researchers’ knowledge, has not been previously operationalised or measured. This paper begins to address this gap by presenting a conceptual model and hypotheses depicting the relationships between the need to vent and CCBs in the context of SSTs.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9780475122148
0475122143
Language eng
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2004, ANZMAC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005408

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Deakin Graduate School of Business
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 446 Abstract Views, 210 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 09:49:21 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.