You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Simulation-based support tool for operator performance in batch manufacturing

Nicholson, David, Gunn, Bruce and Nahavandi, Saeid 2004, Simulation-based support tool for operator performance in batch manufacturing, in Proceedings of abstracts and papers of the 5th Asia-Pacific Industrial Engineering and Management Systems Conference & the 7th Asia-Pacific division meeting of the International Foundation of Production Research : Gold Coast, Australia, 12-15 December 2004, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld., pp. 1-11.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
nahavandi-simulationbasedsupport-2004.pdf Published version application/pdf 794.83KB 173

Title Simulation-based support tool for operator performance in batch manufacturing
Author(s) Nicholson, David
Gunn, Bruce
Nahavandi, Saeid
Conference name Asia-Pacific Industrial Engineering and Management Systems. Conference (5th : 2004 : Gold Coast, Queensland)
Conference location Gold Coast, Queensland
Conference dates 12-15 Dec. 2004
Title of proceedings Proceedings of abstracts and papers of the 5th Asia-Pacific Industrial Engineering and Management Systems Conference & the 7th Asia-Pacific division meeting of the International Foundation of Production Research : Gold Coast, Australia, 12-15 December 2004
Editor(s) Kozan, Erhan
Publication date 2004
Conference series Asia-Pacific Industrial Engineering and Management Systems Conference
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Queensland University of Technology
Place of publication Brisbane, Qld.
Keyword(s) ergonomics & human factors
simulation
production management
Summary In industry, the workload and utilization of shop floor operators is often misunderstood. In this paper, we will present several real case studies, using Discrete Event Simulation (DES) models, which allow us to better understand operators in a batch manufacturing environment. The first study investigates labour in a machining plant consisting of multiple identical CNC machines that batch produce parts. The second study investigates labour in an eight station, gravity die casting rotary table. The results from these studies have shown that there can be potential improvements made by the production planners in the current labour configuration. In the first case study, a matrix is produced that estimates what the operator's utilization levels will be for various configurations. From this, the preferred operator to machine ratio over a range of cycle times is presented. In the second study, the results have shown that by reducing the casting cycle time, the operator would be overloaded. A discrete event simulation of these two cases highlighted areas that were misunderstood by plant management, and provided them with a useful decision support tool for production planning.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 0959629181
9780959629187
Language eng
Field of Research 099999 Engineering not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005450

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Engineering and Technology
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 598 Abstract Views, 173 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 09:49:52 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.