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The use of home experimentation kits for distance students in first-year undergraduate electronics

Long, John M., Florance, J. R. and Joordens, Matthew 2004, The use of home experimentation kits for distance students in first-year undergraduate electronics, in Proceedings of the 2004 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition, American Society for Engineering Education, Washington, D.C..

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Title The use of home experimentation kits for distance students in first-year undergraduate electronics
Author(s) Long, John M.
Florance, J. R.
Joordens, Matthew
Conference name American Society for Engineering Education. Conference (2004 : Salt Lake City, Utah)
Conference location Salt Lake City, Utah
Conference dates 20-23 June 2004
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the 2004 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition
Editor(s) Abata, Duane
Publication date 2004
Conference series American Society for Engineering Education Conference
Publisher American Society for Engineering Education
Place of publication Washington, D.C.
Summary Laboratory and practical classes are an important part of the education of students in electronics and electrical engineering. "Hands-on" experience is critical for any engineer working in these fields in particular. For many years, delivering engineering practicals to distance-education students has been a tremendous challenge for universities. For a number of years now, students enrolled in the common first-year electronics course by distance mode at Deakin University have received a home experimentation kit. Using the kit and a laboratory manual, students are required to complete a number of experiments based on components included in the kit. The kit supports a full range of practical activities for digital electronics, and a more limited range of activities for analog electronics. With the kit, off campus students are supplied software for simulating AC electronic circuits, such as amplifiers and rectifiers. In this report we examine the past use of this kit and software,
review anecdotal student experiences with the package, and propose changes to it and to other curriculum resources, aiming to enhance the use of the kit by distance students. Key curriculum resources planned are a web-based 'companion' for the components in and the use of the kit, and two additions to the kit itself: a battery powered function generator, and a PC-based oscilloscope.
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ISSN 1524-4857
Language eng
Field of Research 130306 Educational Technology and Computing
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2004, American Society for Engineering Education
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005458

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Engineering and Technology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.