You are not logged in.

Reconceptualising outsourcing in the public sector : choices and outcomes

Young, Suzanne 2004, Reconceptualising outsourcing in the public sector : choices and outcomes, in AIRAANZ 2004 : New Economies : New Industrial Relations : Proceedings of the 18th AIRAANZ Conference, Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand, [Noosa, Qld.], pp. 635-643.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Reconceptualising outsourcing in the public sector : choices and outcomes
Author(s) Young, Suzanne
Conference name Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand. Conference (18th : 2004 : Noosa, Qld.)
Conference location Noosa, Qld.
Conference dates 3-6 Feb. 2004
Title of proceedings AIRAANZ 2004 : New Economies : New Industrial Relations : Proceedings of the 18th AIRAANZ Conference
Editor(s) Barry, Michael
Brosnan, Peter
Publication date 2004
Conference series Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand Conference
Start page 635
End page 643
Publisher Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand
Place of publication [Noosa, Qld.]
Summary National Competition Policy’s introduction encouraged the use of outsourcing in the public sector, but variations in the extent and types of services outsourced were evident. Through reviewing the economic and political literature, this paper has uncovered six reasons for outsourcing that straddle the two paradigms. The desire to reduce costs and increase efficiency, focus on core competitive advantage, introduce workforce flexibility, manage industrial relations’ problems, satisfy decision-makers’ personal objectives and adhere to the neo-liberal government agenda are discussed. The paper puts forward a number of models which delve into the relationship between the theoretical factors which economic and political theorists have proposed as being important in making the decision to outsource and delineates between those factors which are perceived by decision-makers as important in their reasoning and those which are unperceived but impact on the outcomes. It concludes that is only by understanding the complex relationship between reasons, and perceived and unperceived factors, will outcomes be able to be predicted.
ISBN 0909291896
9780909291891
Language eng
Field of Research 150312 Organisational Planning and Management
Socio Economic Objective 910402 Management
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2004, Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005472

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Management and Marketing
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 361 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 09:50:09 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.