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Smaller steps into longer journeys : experiencing African music and expressing culture

Joseph, Dawn 2004, Smaller steps into longer journeys : experiencing African music and expressing culture, in AARME 2004 : Proceedings of the XXVIth Australian Association for Research in Music Education Annual Conference, AARME, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 216-225.

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Title Smaller steps into longer journeys : experiencing African music and expressing culture
Author(s) Joseph, DawnORCID iD for Joseph, Dawn orcid.org/0000-0002-6320-900X
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Music Education. Conference (26th : 2004 : Tweed Heads, Queensland)
Conference location Tweed Heads, Queensland
Conference dates 25 - 28 September 2004
Title of proceedings AARME 2004 : Proceedings of the XXVIth Australian Association for Research in Music Education Annual Conference
Editor(s) Chaseling, Marilyn
Publication date 2004
Conference series Australian Association for Research in Music Education Conference
Start page 216
End page 225
Publisher AARME
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) Ethnomusicology -- Africa
Music in education
Ethnology -- Africa
Music -- Instruction and study -- Australia
Summary This paper outlines an exploratory research project that draws on survey data from both primary and secondary school music teachers in Victoria. The research stems from a study that I undertook in 2002-2003 with final year Deakin University undergraduate students. That project investigated the potential of African music to enhance the generic musical experiences, learning, motivation, interest, confidence and competence of non-specialist primary teacher education students. The research project being reported in this paper is an extension of the previous study to focus on practising music teachers at both primary and secondary school levels. The research addresses the significance and contribution of African music and culture as a cross-cultural experience for music teachers, their students and the wider community. It further considers my role as an African music practitioner in terms of transformation and acculturation. This paper outlines the progress of, and provides preliminary data about, the emergence of an innovative area of teaching and learning based on African music in Victorian schools. It also explores the notion of why cross-cultural and multi-cultural engagement matters in the contemporary context of educational change.
ISBN 0958608679
9780958608671
Language eng
Field of Research 130299 Curriculum and Pedagogy not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005558

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Social and Cultural Studies in Education
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