You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Masakhane: drumming up an effective music curriculum for pre-service teacher education

Joseph, Dawn 2004, Masakhane: drumming up an effective music curriculum for pre-service teacher education, in AARE 2004 : Doing the public good : positioning educational research ; AARE 2004 International Education Research conference proceedings, Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE), Coldstream, Vic., pp. 1-8.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
joseph-masakhane-2005.pdf Published version application/pdf 152.02KB 169

Title Masakhane: drumming up an effective music curriculum for pre-service teacher education
Author(s) Joseph, DawnORCID iD for Joseph, Dawn orcid.org/0000-0002-6320-900X
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference (2004 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic
Conference dates 28 November - 2 December 2004
Title of proceedings AARE 2004 : Doing the public good : positioning educational research ; AARE 2004 International Education Research conference proceedings
Editor(s) Jeffrey, Peter L.
Publication date 2004
Series PANDORA electronic collection
Start page 1
End page 8
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE)
Place of publication Coldstream, Vic.
Keyword(s) Education -- Australia -- Congresses.
music -- Africa
Summary The introduction of African indigenous music to a generalist primary teacher education course transcended both cultural differences and personal inadequacies of students. It provided a cohesive bond for promoting the learning of music that is aptly represented by the African concept of masakhane (building together). This research demonstrated the effectiveness of Africa music for promoting cross-cultural music education, thereby providing a worthy model for implementation in other teacher education programs. According to findings from a questionnaire survey and interviews, students reported they were able to more effectively engage with, know, create, perform, teach and experience music through African rather than just the Western music. This experience provided students with new musical knowledge, understandings and skills as well as giving them insights into another musical tradition and culture. Students also perceived Indigenous African music as a source of motivation, interest and enjoyment, thereby promoting their creativity and musical learning. As global citizens, we need to embrace diversity and change not only in our immediate teaching contexts but also in broader educational policy. This curriculum clearly enhanced the effectiveness of music within a teacher education course and by extension has the potential to contribute to a greater professional and public good in education.
Notes Also Titled: Doing the Public Good: Positioning Educational Research Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISSN 1324-9339
Language eng
Field of Research 130299 Curriculum and Pedagogy not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2005
Copyright notice ©2005, The Author
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005587

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Social and Cultural Studies in Education
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 617 Abstract Views, 169 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 09:51:34 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.