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An early painter's persona as metaphor

Rentschler, Ruth 2005, An early painter's persona as metaphor, in Marketing : Building Business, Shaping Society. Proceedings of the 2005 Academy of Marketing Conference, Dublin Institute of Technology Faculty of Business, Dublin, Ireland, pp. 1-13.

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Title An early painter's persona as metaphor
Author(s) Rentschler, Ruth
Conference name Academy of Marketing Conference (2005 : Dublin, Ireland)
Conference location Dublin, Ireland
Conference dates 5-7 July 2005
Title of proceedings Marketing : Building Business, Shaping Society. Proceedings of the 2005 Academy of Marketing Conference
Editor(s) Ghallachoir, Kate
Publication date 2005
Conference series Academy of Marketing Conference
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13 p.
Publisher Dublin Institute of Technology Faculty of Business
Place of publication Dublin, Ireland
Keyword(s) Marketing -- Congresses
Consumer behavior -- Congresses
Business -- Congresses
Competition -- Congresses
Summary This article analyses the marketing of an early Australian entrepreneurial female painter as metaphor in the exploration of the brand concept. It does so through the extension of her persona to her art, through examination of her diaries, letters and public documents. The use of the metaphor as a means of promulgating the 'brand as person' is discussed. Thus, the buyer of art chooses a painting with confidence because of the personality projected by the creator of the art work, in the same way as a successful brand of another product might be purchased. This article places the analysis within the context of social change of the time, giving some indication of the market and competitor positions and her motivation for differentiating herself from others. It highlights the conflict that the painter's brand caused to the artist's competitors at the time and how that affected her long-term reputation. The artist's idiosyncratic approach to painting and her vigorous self-promotion as an artist sought a reappraisal of the genre of lowly flower painting in the late nineteenth century.
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ISBN 1905824009
9781905824007
Language eng
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2005, Dublin Institute of Technology Faculty of Business
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005593

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.