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Empowering Australian students in African music: experiential education in primary teacher training

Joseph, Dawn and Southcott, Jane 2005, Empowering Australian students in African music: experiential education in primary teacher training, in APSMER 2005: 5th Asia Pacific Symposium on Music Education Research, University of Washington, School of Music, Seattle, Wash., pp. 1-11.

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Title Empowering Australian students in African music: experiential education in primary teacher training
Author(s) Joseph, DawnORCID iD for Joseph, Dawn orcid.org/0000-0002-6320-900X
Southcott, Jane
Conference name Asia-Pacific Symposium on Music Education Research (5th : 2005 : Seattle, Washington)
Conference location Seattle, Washington, USA
Conference dates 14 - 16 July 2005
Title of proceedings APSMER 2005: 5th Asia Pacific Symposium on Music Education Research
Editor(s) Morrison, Stephen J.
Publication date 2005
Conference series Asia-Pacific Symposium on Music Education Research
Start page 1
End page 11
Publisher University of Washington, School of Music
Place of publication Seattle, Wash.
Summary Luckman (1996) defines experiential education as a "process through which a learner constructs knowledge, skill and value from direct experience" (p. 7). The core of such learning is practical engagement, contextualised by concepts and skills in guided experiences. This process, to be most effective, should be supported by reflection. This paper considers an experiential program in African music that is part of pre-service primary teacher education for generalist teacher trainees. As part of the Bachelor of Primary Education degree, offered by Deakin University (Australia) students can select an elective subject on African music in the final year of their four-year course. In this subject students learn African music experientially, by playing, singing and moving. These students completed a questionnaire and were interviewed at the conclusion of the unit in 2003. Data collected showed the effectiveness of using an unknown music to explore musical concepts and understandings in an Australian educational setting.
Language eng
Field of Research 130299 Curriculum and Pedagogy not elsewhere classified
200299 Cultural Studies not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005605

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Social and Cultural Studies in Education
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