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Celebrating the use of African music : change in motion

Joseph, Dawn 2005, Celebrating the use of African music : change in motion, in Celebration of voices : XV national conference proceedings, Australian Society for Music Education Incorporated (ASME), Parkville, Vic, pp. 128-133.

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Title Celebrating the use of African music : change in motion
Author(s) Joseph, DawnORCID iD for Joseph, Dawn orcid.org/0000-0002-6320-900X
Conference name Australian Society for Music Education. National Conference (15th : 2005 : Melbourne)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic
Conference dates 3 - 7 July 2005
Title of proceedings Celebration of voices : XV national conference proceedings
Editor(s) Forrest, David Lawrence
Publication date 2005
Conference series Australian Society for Music Education Conference
Start page 128
End page 133
Publisher Australian Society for Music Education Incorporated (ASME)
Place of publication Parkville, Vic
Keyword(s) Music -- Africa
Music -- Instruction and study -- Australia
Music in education -- Congresses
Summary I undertook a research project regarding the use of African music at both primary and secondary school level with Victorian teachers in Melbourne in 2004. This study grew out of my first project, which examined the effectiveness of using African music with non-specialist primary teacher education students at Deakin University, Melbourne (see Joseph, 2002, 2003). In this paper the concept of 'change' in relation to teaching and learning is explored regarding practising teachers’ teaching and learning of African music in Australian schools. According to Campbell (2004), a guiding principle for shaping educational experiences designed to promote students’ musical and cultural understanding is for teachers to make music both meaningful and useful in their lives. She further contends that such an experience can 'come alive' for students if teachers promote active involvement for them as music listeners as well as makers of music. This paper discusses some of the findings in relation to why and how teachers are engaging with African music and what their students are learning from it. It may be argued that both students (Deakin University student project) and teachers (Victorian music project) perceived African music to be an effective way to transmit and engage with a 'new music and culture'.
Notes Also Titled: Fifteenth national conference proceedings 15th national conference proceedings
ISBN 0957741359
9780957741355
Language eng
Field of Research 130201 Creative Arts, Media and Communication Curriculum and Pedagogy
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005607

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Social and Cultural Studies in Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.