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An assessment of the energy and water embodied in commercial building construction

Crawford, Robert and Treloar, Graham 2005, An assessment of the energy and water embodied in commercial building construction, in Australian Life Cycle Assessment Conference (4th : 2005 : Novotel, Sydney, N.S.W.), Australian Life Cycle Assessment Society, Sydney, N.S.W., pp. 1-10.

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Title An assessment of the energy and water embodied in commercial building construction
Author(s) Crawford, Robert
Treloar, Graham
Conference name 4th Australian Life Cycle Assessment Conference : Sustainability measures for decision support, Australian Life Cycle Assessment Society : 23-25 February, 2005, Novotel Sydney on Darling Harbour
Conference location Sydney
Conference dates 23-25 February 2005
Title of proceedings Australian Life Cycle Assessment Conference (4th : 2005 : Novotel, Sydney, N.S.W.)
Editor(s) James, K.
Grant, T.
Pagan, B.
Wiegard, J.
Publication date 2005
Conference series Australian Life Cycle Assessment Conference
Start page 1
End page 10
Publisher Australian Life Cycle Assessment Society
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Keyword(s) commercial buildings
embodied energy analysis
embodied water analysis
hybrid analysis
Summary Growing global concern regarding the rapid rate at which humans are consuming the earth’s precious natural resources is leading to greater emphasis on more effective means of providing for our current and future needs. Energy and fresh water are the most crucial of these basic human needs. The energy and water required in the operation of buildings is fairly well known. Much less is known about the energy and water embodied in construction materials and products. It has been suggested that embodied energy typically represents 20 times the annual operational energy of current Australian buildings. Studies have suggested that the water embodied in buildings may be just as significant as that of energy. As for embodied energy, these studies have been based on traditional analysis methods, such as process and input-output analysis. These methods have been shown to suffer from errors relating to the availability of data and its reliability. Hybrid methods have been developed in an attempt to provide a more reliable assessment of the embodied energy and water associated with the construction of buildings. This paper evaluates the energy and water resources embodied in a commercial office building using a hybrid analysis method based on input-output data. It was found that the use of this hybrid analysis method increases the reliability and completeness of an embodied energy and water analysis of a typical commercial building by 45% and 64% respectively, over traditional analysis methods. The embodied energy and water associated with building construction is significant and thus represents an area where considerable energy and water savings are possible over the building life-cycle. These findings suggest that current best-practice methods of embodied energy and water analysis are sufficiently accurate for most typical applications, but this is heavily dependent upon data quality and availability.
Notes Also Titled: Fourth Australian Life Cycle Assessment Conference / Sustainability measures for decision support.

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ISBN 0975723103
9780975723104
Language eng
Field of Research 129999 Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2005, Australian Life Cycle Assessment Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005640

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.