Drawing and the subjectivity of the 'other'

Lozanovska, Mirjana 2005, Drawing and the subjectivity of the 'other', in AASA 2005 : Drawing together : convergent practices in architectural education, Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference of the Association of Architectural Schools of Australasia, [Queensland University of Technology], [Brisbane, Qld], pp. 1-6.

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Title Drawing and the subjectivity of the 'other'
Author(s) Lozanovska, Mirjana
Conference name International Conference of the Association of Architectural Schools of Australasia (3rd : 2005 : Brisbane, Queensland)
Conference location Brisbane, Queensland
Conference dates 28-30 September 2005
Title of proceedings AASA 2005 : Drawing together : convergent practices in architectural education, Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference of the Association of Architectural Schools of Australasia
Editor(s) Holt-Damant, K.
Sanders, P.
Publication date 2005
Conference series Association of Architectural Schools of Australasia Conference
Start page 1
End page 6
Publisher [Queensland University of Technology]
Place of publication [Brisbane, Qld]
Keyword(s) identity
aboriginality
drawing
imagination
house
Summary Scenes of the Aboriginal family sitting around a table in the film The Fringe Dwellers present the boy quietly drawing, while other members of the family are engaged in discussion. The boy is less visible, more passive and contemplative, and his subjectivity is suggested rather than explored in the film. He repeats the same activity and the same inward concentration. My hypothesis is that the boy's subjectivity and agency are projected elsewhere, towards an imaginary field beyond the film's structure and beyond the social reality of the film's outside. What is the aboriginal boy drawing? In one scene, is a glimpse of his 'projection', he draws a house. The boy is mesmerised and pre-occupied by his drawing. We have seen the mystery of this preoccupation in images of heroic modernist architects (Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, Oscar Niemeyer come to mind) presenting a connection between the hand of the architect and his sketch as an essential gift in the making of a 'master architect'. Through this visual association, the 'Aboriginal boy drawing' is associated with the field of 'a universal human subject' and the essay investigates how his practice might participate in new subjective positions across disciplines. Through his inscriptions, the Aboriginal boy expresses more than a wish: he articulates and inhabits another dwelling, an imaginary dwelling of a subjectivity and 'identity' beyond the black and white divide. The boy, however, is not a 'master', making his drawing a subversive and risky practice.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 1864998415
9781864998412
Language eng
Field of Research 120502 History and Theory of the Built Environment (excl Architecture)
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2005, AASA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005712

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