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Genre, gender and interpretation of movie trailers an exploratory study

Moore, Carolyn A., Bednall, David and Adam, Stewart 2005, Genre, gender and interpretation of movie trailers an exploratory study, in ANZMAC 2005 : Broadening the boundaries, conference proceedings, ANZMAC, Dunedin, N.Z., pp. 124-130.

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Title Genre, gender and interpretation of movie trailers an exploratory study
Author(s) Moore, Carolyn A.
Bednall, David
Adam, Stewart
Conference name Australian & New Zealand Marketing Academy. Conference (2005 : Fremantle, Western Australia)
Conference location Fremantle, Western Australia
Conference dates 5-7 December 2005
Title of proceedings ANZMAC 2005 : Broadening the boundaries, conference proceedings
Editor(s) Purchase, Sharon
Publication date 2005
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference
Start page 124
End page 130
Publisher ANZMAC
Place of publication Dunedin, N.Z.
Summary Commercial movies cost tens of millions to make. Because they are now released on thousands of screens simultaneously, movie trailers are a major and necessary method of intensively promoting movies before they disappear from cinemas forever. Yet there is a paucity of research about how potential audiences react to these trailers. This study aimed at exploring consumers’ interpretations of movie trailers. Nineteen in-depth interviews were the means of data collection, using nine trailers for yet to be released movies from the romance/drama, action, comedy and thriller categories. Genre provided a focus for exploring consumers’ interpretations of movie trailers. Evaluative judgments of movies came first as a result of the value of genre to the consumer and then as a result of content which conveyed the movie would be involving relative to past movie experiences. Interpretations about the target audience for a movie were also influenced by assumptions that genre preferences differ according to gender. The findings pose implications for the construction of movie trailers.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 064645546X
9780646455464
Language eng
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2005, ANZMAC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005815

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.