An investigation of scale economies and quality issues in the teaching and management of large subjects

Hall, J., Kennedy, W., Madden-Hallett, H. and Binney, W. 2005, An investigation of scale economies and quality issues in the teaching and management of large subjects, in Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Conference: Marketing : building business, shaping society, Westburn Publishers, Helensburgh, Scotland, pp. 1-11.

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Title An investigation of scale economies and quality issues in the teaching and management of large subjects
Author(s) Hall, J.
Kennedy, W.
Madden-Hallett, H.
Binney, W.
Conference name AM2005 Academy of Marketing Conference (2005 : Dublin, Ireland)
Conference location Dublin, Ireland
Conference dates 5-7 Jul. 2005
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Conference: Marketing : building business, shaping society
Editor(s) Ghallachoir, Kate
Publication date 2005
Conference series Academy of Marketing Conference
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11 p.
Publisher Westburn Publishers
Place of publication Helensburgh, Scotland
Summary Many in the tertiary education system have had concerns with the issues surrounding the teaching of large classes, including teaching quality and whether there are effective learning outcomes for students. An issue closely related to quality is the cost of providing an efficacious education system. It is a common perception that large classes are economical to run and small subjects are not. As with any complex issue there are several perspectives that could be utilised, the needs of the institution, the teaching staff, the community or the students, and whether or not these needs are being met.

This study aims to assess whether universities are meeting the needs of students in large marketing classes. For this purpose the study investigates the application of selfdetermination theory and psychological needs satisfaction. The basic needs scale, comprising of three constructs; Control, Competence and Caring was adapted and used to evaluate students' perception of an introductory marketing subject.

The study used a multi-method approach consisting of a literature review, a qualitative phase involving in-depth interviews and focus groups. A survey of 366 students who had undertaken an introductory level marketing subject in a large class format was also conducted. The results show that the psychological needs satisfaction of many students are not being fully realised. It was also found that marketing degree students enjoyed the challenges and were more stimulated by the subject (than students in other degree streams). The higher achieving students enjoyed the challenge of the subject more than the lower achieving students. The implications of these findings and suggestions for
further investigation are discussed.
Language eng
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2005, Westburn Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005850

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Deakin Graduate School of Business
Higher Education Research Group
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