Local content policy in the Australian television industry

Manning, Elizabeth 2005, Local content policy in the Australian television industry, in COE/JEPA Joint International Conference : The 4th International Conference of the Japan Economic Policy Association, Program, abstracts and full papers (excluding COE plenary and special sessions) and program : Towards a new economic paradigm, declining population growth, labor market transition and economic development under globalization, JEPA/21st Century COE Program, Kobe, Japan, pp. 1-18.

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Title Local content policy in the Australian television industry
Author(s) Manning, Elizabeth
Conference name COE/JEPA Joint International Conference (4th : 2005 : Kobe, Japan)
Conference location Kobe, Japan
Conference dates 17-18 December, 2005
Title of proceedings COE/JEPA Joint International Conference : The 4th International Conference of the Japan Economic Policy Association, Program, abstracts and full papers (excluding COE plenary and special sessions) and program : Towards a new economic paradigm, declining population growth, labor market transition and economic development under globalization
Editor(s) Maruya, Reishi
Publication date 2005
Conference series Japan Economic Policy Association and the 21st Century COE Programme of Kobe University Joint International Conference
Start page 1
End page 18
Publisher JEPA/21st Century COE Program
Place of publication Kobe, Japan
Summary This paper examines the impact and effectiveness of the local content scheme currently operating in the Australian Television industry. The television industry is a service industry with public good aspects. Public interest arguments have traditionally been used to support the retention (and indeed expansion) of the local content scheme since it was first introduced in 1961. These objectives have included the promotion of Australian culture, the desire to ensure a diversity of views may be heard and that diverse interests may be catered for when preferences cannot be directly gauged.

The problems associated with defining what constitutes "Australian" content are examined along with the costs and effectiveness of the local content scheme in meeting public interest concerns. The paper finds that the local content scheme has become part of a package of protection in the broadcasting industry that has resulted in valuable television licences and powerful and entrenched interests. It also shows that the local content scheme is not particularly effective in meeting it's objectives, and will become increasingly irrelevant in the light of rapidly changing technology. Other methods of meeting public objectives are suggested.
Language eng
Field of Research 140210 International Economics and International Finance
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005855

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Accounting, Economics and Finance
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