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Change happens: acceptance of 'impermanence' and 'flow' in teachers' professional reflections on technology and change

Johnson, Richard and Lynch, Julianne 2004, Change happens: acceptance of 'impermanence' and 'flow' in teachers' professional reflections on technology and change, in AARE 2004 : Doing the public good : positioning educational research ; AARE 2004 International Education Research conference proceedings, The Association, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 1-14.

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Title Change happens: acceptance of 'impermanence' and 'flow' in teachers' professional reflections on technology and change
Author(s) Johnson, Richard
Lynch, JulianneORCID iD for Lynch, Julianne orcid.org/0000-0003-3180-8224
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference (2004 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 28 November - 2 December 2004
Title of proceedings AARE 2004 : Doing the public good : positioning educational research ; AARE 2004 International Education Research conference proceedings
Editor(s) Jeffrey, P.
Publication date 2004
Conference series Australian Association for Research in Education Conference
Start page 1
End page 14
Publisher The Association
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary For several years the authors of this paper have monitored the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in primary and secondary schools. In this paper they report on their work in progress, focusing particularly on data collected via teacher interviews in 2003. It is a 'good news' story that celebrates a shift in the way school teachers approach ICT, and that shows that teachers are a lot more comfortable with ICT than the authors have previously observed. The authors argue that a significant transition has occurred in the hardware, software and 'warmware', the people and how they can work with the hardware and software as part of their pedagogy. Existing research tends to construct change as something that has to be planned, prepared for and managed (eg. Fullan, 1997), and as something that teachers often resist (eg. Cuban, 1993; Grunberg & Summers, 1992; Hodas, 1998). This paper is distinctive in drawing on Eastern approaches to understanding change. Through an examination of the concepts of "impermanence" and "flow," and how they apply to ICT, schools and teachers' work, we seek to demystify change: Change happens, has happened and will continue to happen. We conclude that teachers' increased familiarity with, and increasingly relaxed approach to, ICT has led to a shift in their attentions, such that they are less concerned with obtaining and mastering particular software and hardware, and more concerned with pedagogy and student learning.


ISSN 1324-9339
Language eng
Field of Research 130306 Educational Technology and Computing
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2005
Copyright notice ©2004, AARE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005912

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.