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Young people with an intellectual disability: risk and resilience.

O'Sullivan, Judith, Webber, Lynne and O`Connor, Barrie 2006, Young people with an intellectual disability: risk and resilience., in Proceedings of the 2006 joint conference of the APS and NZPsS : psychology bridging the Tasman : science culture and practice, Australian Psychological Society, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 310-314.

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Title Young people with an intellectual disability: risk and resilience.
Author(s) O'Sullivan, Judith
Webber, Lynne
O`Connor, Barrie
Conference name Australian Psychological Society. Conference (2006 : Auckland, New Zealand)
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 26-30 September 2006
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the 2006 joint conference of the APS and NZPsS : psychology bridging the Tasman : science culture and practice
Editor(s) Katsikitis, Mary
Publication date 2006
Conference series Australian Psychological Society Conference
Start page 310
End page 314
Publisher Australian Psychological Society
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary There is a large body of literature about personal risk and resilience among children and adolescents from a variety of subpopulations. However, in intellectual disability research, resilience has almost exclusively been investigated and reported at the level of family stress and coping rather than an individual child's capacity to function adaptively despite severe risk. In this study young people with an intellectual disability, family members and non-family members (carers, teachers and family friends) were interviewed and asked about the young people’s relationships, coping styles, behaviour patterns and resilience. The main features placing these young people at risk included having autism or inflexible patterns of behaviour, displaying some forms of challenging behaviour, difficulty with receptive and expressive communication, living in families with high competing demands for time and living in a relatively unaccommodating community environment. The main factors leading to resilience were an attractive appearance/disposition, ability to get one’s message across, ability to adapt behaviour to changing contexts, low family stress levels and high sense of competence, stable relationships with supportive others and an accommodating/accepting community environment (both school and social).
ISBN 0909881308
9780909881306
Language eng
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30005980

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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