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Modelling of fabric energy storage systems - a review

Cheung, C. K., Fuller, R. J. and Luther, M. B. 2006, Modelling of fabric energy storage systems - a review, in Investigating the roles and challenges of building performance simulation in achieving a sustainable built environment : proceedings of the IBPSA Australasia 2006 Conference, School of Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design, University of Adelaide and IBPSA Australasia, Adelaide, S. Aust., pp. 149-156.

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Title Modelling of fabric energy storage systems - a review
Author(s) Cheung, C. K.
Fuller, R. J.
Luther, M. B.
Conference name International Building Performance Simulation Association. Conference (2006 : Adelaide, South Australia)
Conference location Adelaide, S. Aust.
Conference dates 20 -21 Nov. 2006
Title of proceedings Investigating the roles and challenges of building performance simulation in achieving a sustainable built environment : proceedings of the IBPSA Australasia 2006 Conference
Editor(s) Soebarto, Veronica
Marshallsay, Patrick
Publication date 2006
Conference series International Building Performance Simulation Association Conference
Start page 149
End page 156
Publisher School of Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design, University of Adelaide and IBPSA Australasia
Place of publication Adelaide, S. Aust.
Summary Fabric energy storage (FES) systems have gained in popularity in the recent years in response to the demand for energy efficient buildings. The dynamic heat transfer mechanisms of an FES require specialised techniques to predict its thermal performance. This requirement has been one of the barriers to the wider use of FES systems. Based on the research literature, this paper presents a critical review of the published mathematical models of FES systems. The paper discusses the usefulness of these models based on the following criteria: the inputs required; the accuracy of predictions; the ability to link with commercially available simulation software: and the degree of difficulty in using the models. The review found that the currently available mathematical models are either not able to predict the thermal behaviour of a building space with an FES system reliably or the models are too complicated and/or require too much specialised knowledge to make them useful.
Notes
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ISBN 064646597X
Language eng
Field of Research 120202 Building Science and Techniques
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2006, The University of Adelaide and IBPSA Australasia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30006005

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.