Responding to terrorism through networks at sites of critical infrastructure : a case study of Australian airport security networks

Whelan, Chad and Palmer, Darren 2006, Responding to terrorism through networks at sites of critical infrastructure : a case study of Australian airport security networks, in Social Change in the 21st Century, Queensland Univeristy of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, pp. 1-13.


Title Responding to terrorism through networks at sites of critical infrastructure : a case study of Australian airport security networks
Author(s) Whelan, Chad
Palmer, Darren
Conference name Social Change in the 21st Century Conference Proceedings
Conference location Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane
Conference dates 27 October 2006
Title of proceedings Social Change in the 21st Century
Editor(s) Hopkinson, C.
Hall, C
Publication date 2006
Series PANDORA electronic collection
Conference series Social Change in the 21st Century Conference
Start page 1
End page 13
Publisher Queensland Univeristy of Technology
Place of publication Brisbane, QLD
Keyword(s) terrorism
counter-terrorism
responsibilisation
risk
security networks
counter-terrorism networks
critical infrastructure
airport security
Summary The importance of effective multilateral security networks is widely recognised in Australia and internationally as being essential to facilitate the large-scale sharing of information required to respond to the threat of terrorism. Australian national security agencies are currently constructing networks in order to bring the diverse national and international security agencies together to achieve this. This paper examines this process of security network formation in the area of critical infrastructure protection, with particular emphasis on airport security. We address the key issues and factors shaping network formation and the dynamics involved in network practice. These include the need for the networks to extend membership beyond the strictly defined elements of national security; the integration of public and private ‘nodes’ in counter-terrorism ‘networks’; and the broader ‘responsibilisation’ of the private sector and the challenges with ‘enabling’ them in counter-terrorism networks. We argue that the need to integrate public and private agencies in counter-terrorism networks is necessary but faces considerable organisational, cultural, and legal barriers.
ISBN 1741071291
Language eng
Field of Research 160299 Criminology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 810107 National Security
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2006, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30006029

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of History, Heritage and Society
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